New Civic 2.2 - Civinfo
 
LinkBack Thread Tools
post #1 of 11 (permalink) Old 10th February 2008, 10:00 Thread Starter
 
Join Date: 26th January 2008
Location: Bournemouth ENGLAND
Posts: 6
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
iTrader: (0)
Unhappy New Civic 2.2

Hi, I'm new to owning a Honda, but i've just taken delivery of a new Civic diesel (Feb 08).
I've covered 1200 miles in 3 weeks and I must admit I'm a bit disappointed with the economy. After 3 refills (47 MPG, 48 MPG and 41 MPG) measured from the pump, not the internal gauge. The first two tankfulls were mainly motorway/dual carriageway to work and back, 36 miles each way, travelling at 70 to 75 MPH indicated, which according to my GPS equates to 65 to 70 (why is the Civic digital speedo so inaccurate). The third tankfull was a cross country journey with a lot of it stuck in traffic on a Friday afternoon on the M25. I am trying to run the car in as gently as possible, no fast acceleration and keeping the revs down to below 3000 RPM.
I never get 6 eco lights come up on the display unless i am going down any sort of slope with my foot off the throttle. Is this how everybody's ecometer works or have I got a duff car.

sorry I should correct the date, took delivery in January 2008
beeno is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 11 (permalink) Old 10th February 2008, 10:06
 
Join Date: 12th February 2007
Posts: 93
Thanks: 1
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
iTrader: (0)
You never get the 6 lights unless you are going down hill .
christophe is offline  
post #3 of 11 (permalink) Old 10th February 2008, 10:40
Vivid Blue Rocks!!!
 
Foggy69's Avatar
 
Car: Suzuki Swift Sport
Join Date: 5th December 2006
Location: Westerham GB
Posts: 1,228
Thanks: 23
Thanked 25 Times in 24 Posts
iTrader: (5)
Hi beeno, and welcome to Civinfo

There is info about the MPG that other users get in the Wiki, under the FAQ

http://www.civinfo.com/wiki/index.php?title=Main_Page

This is the survey in full

http://www.civinfo.com/forum/survey....results&sid=32

As for the speedo, yes it is a pain in the proverbial, but a fix has been found for that as well

http://www.civinfo.com/forum/how/834...te-speedo.html

Last edited by Foggy69; 10th February 2008 at 10:42. Reason: Edit link
Foggy69 is offline  
 
post #4 of 11 (permalink) Old 12th February 2008, 14:36
Supporter
 
amronno's Avatar
 
Car: 2012 1.8i Ex Navi Leather MR
Join Date: 8th August 2007
Location: Bergen, Norway NO
Posts: 1,600
Thanks: 216
Thanked 84 Times in 78 Posts
iTrader: (1)
Hello beeno!

Welcome to the club.
amronno is offline  
post #5 of 11 (permalink) Old 15th February 2008, 22:54
 
Join Date: 29th January 2008
Posts: 103
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
iTrader: (0)
Quote:
Originally Posted by beeno View Post
Hi, I'm new to owning a Honda, but i've just taken delivery of a new Civic diesel (Feb 08).
I've covered 1200 miles in 3 weeks and I must admit I'm a bit disappointed with the economy. After 3 refills (47 MPG, 48 MPG and 41 MPG) measured from the pump, not the internal gauge. The first two tankfulls were mainly motorway/dual carriageway to work and back, 36 miles each way, travelling at 70 to 75 MPH indicated, which according to my GPS equates to 65 to 70 (why is the Civic digital speedo so inaccurate). The third tankfull was a cross country journey with a lot of it stuck in traffic on a Friday afternoon on the M25. I am trying to run the car in as gently as possible, no fast acceleration and keeping the revs down to below 3000 RPM.
I never get 6 eco lights come up on the display unless i am going down any sort of slope with my foot off the throttle. Is this how everybody's ecometer works or have I got a duff car.

sorry I should correct the date, took delivery in January 2008
Hi Beeno !
First of all, a turbo diesel has to be thrashed in a intelligent way to be run-in proper and that will give you real good consumption oerformance. Poor run-in = poor compression cause the rings dont get sealed enough and therefore poor compression = less power & torque that leads you to press on that pedal for more acceleration or speed stability. If your under 1500 miles, its not too late to catch-up with some good running-in, go to the WIKI and check running-in diesel engines ! You'll understand what happens inside an engine. As the milage goes by, you will see a great difference of consumption. According to older civic riders, after 5000 miles only will the car be less greedy on fuel. I have the same problem as you regarding fuel consumption with much lesser milage than you, only 170 miles on clock !! Patience ... it's a diesel and they require a lot more time than petrol civics.
philippeclement is offline  
post #6 of 11 (permalink) Old 16th February 2008, 21:22
Supporter
 
Join Date: 13th September 2007
Posts: 914
Thanks: 20
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
iTrader: (0)
Hi Beeno, welcome to Civinfo

3000 rpm is a lot for this engine, I guess your previous car was a petrol?
The general rule with a turbodiesel: apart from driving on from standstill, take one gear higher as you would on a petrol in the same speed range. I often accelerate quite swiftly in 1st gear from standstill (not spinning my wheels but swiftly) then change to 3rd at some 30 km/h and to 5th at 45-50 km/h, on longer city strips I add my "VAT" to the allowed 50 km/h and at some 58 km/h displayed (maybe 55 km/h real speed) I go on with 6th, as long as there are no steeps to take it's no problem, really. I know this would murder a petrol engine but with a high-torque diesel it's OK. The skipping of gears also saves fuel (and the clutch).
On the Autobahn - if I'm not in a hurry (or in a mood for low-flying ) limiting speed to 150 km/h is very economical (130 would be more economical but then some old van might honk at you to go faster).
Using the cruise control will save you another 0,5 l/100, whereas turning off the aircon brings no (measurable) savings.
With the above tips, you should get between 5,5 and 7 l/100 km
it's still not as good as it gets (my best value was about 4,6 or 4,8 I don't remember exactly) but this is possible only with really lame driving and it's not what the Civic was made for is it?
Cars with smaller engines and less weight will have better economy still, but one can't have everything...
civicfan is offline  
post #7 of 11 (permalink) Old 16th February 2008, 21:57
 
Join Date: 29th January 2008
Posts: 103
Thanks: 0
Thanked 1 Time in 1 Post
iTrader: (0)
Quote:
Originally Posted by civicfan View Post
Hi Beeno, welcome to Civinfo

3000 rpm is a lot for this engine, I guess your previous car was a petrol?
The general rule with a turbodiesel: apart from driving on from standstill, take one gear higher as you would on a petrol in the same speed range. I often accelerate quite swiftly in 1st gear from standstill (not spinning my wheels but swiftly) then change to 3rd at some 30 km/h and to 5th at 45-50 km/h, on longer city strips I add my "VAT" to the allowed 50 km/h and at some 58 km/h displayed (maybe 55 km/h real speed) I go on with 6th, as long as there are no steeps to take it's no problem, really. I know this would murder a petrol engine but with a high-torque diesel it's OK. The skipping of gears also saves fuel (and the clutch).
On the Autobahn - if I'm not in a hurry (or in a mood for low-flying ) limiting speed to 150 km/h is very economical (130 would be more economical but then some old van might honk at you to go faster).
Using the cruise control will save you another 0,5 l/100, whereas turning off the aircon brings no (measurable) savings.
With the above tips, you should get between 5,5 and 7 l/100 km
it's still not as good as it gets (my best value was about 4,6 or 4,8 I don't remember exactly) but this is possible only with really lame driving and it's not what the Civic was made for is it?
Cars with smaller engines and less weight will have better economy still, but one can't have everything...
Excuse me dear civicfan, but it seems that there are no mention what so ever regarding the revs in the technical manual ? I suppose it to be gradual as milage increases and 3000 rpm wont be so much if you dont stick to it !, its just a peak of a fraction of a sec while pulling on to the next gear to rev around 2000 to 2500 rpm, please bear in mind that these modern engines with precise machined bores has much less milage to run-in and the first 700 miles or 1000 km are indeed the most important, this is the occasion given to get those seals bedded proper. There is no catching up possible if one drive 3000 miles with 1500 - 2000 rpm and decides to increase rpm later on cause the rings get oval instead of bedding in the total circonference, thus leading to poor compression ... etc ... as said previously.
philippeclement is offline  
post #8 of 11 (permalink) Old 16th February 2008, 22:05
Supporter
 
Join Date: 13th September 2007
Posts: 914
Thanks: 20
Thanked 5 Times in 5 Posts
iTrader: (0)
Quote:
Originally Posted by philippeclement View Post
Excuse me dear civicfan, but it seems that there are no mention what so ever regarding the revs in the technical manual ? I suppose it to be gradual as milage increases and 3000 rpm wont be so much if you dont stick to it !, its just a peak of a fraction of a sec while pulling on to the next gear to rev around 2000 to 2500 rpm, please bear in mind that these modern engines with precise machined bores has much less milage to run-in and the first 700 miles or 1000 km are indeed the most important, this is the occasion given to get those seals bedded proper. There is no catching up possible if one drive 3000 miles with 1500 - 2000 rpm and decides to increase rpm later on cause the rings get oval instead of bedding in the total circonference, thus leading to poor compression ... etc ... as said previously.
As for technical terms I don't know, I am no engineer, but I have driven some 500.000 km in total, with 3 different Diesel cars, in the manner described above (including the run-in phase) and none was later consuming oil or such... Of course I will drive more dynamically if I'm in a hurry (or in the mood to do so) but it has become rather an exception (we all get older don't we?) In so many words - maybe it seems risky for the engine but it doesn't show in (my) practice
civicfan is offline  
post #9 of 11 (permalink) Old 17th February 2008, 14:03 Thread Starter
** Thread starter **
 
Join Date: 26th January 2008
Location: Bournemouth ENGLAND
Posts: 6
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
iTrader: (0)
Thumbs up

thanks for all the replies, i'm very grateful.

It would seem that there are still a lot of theories on how a diesel should be run in, there seems to be no definitive answer. I have just filled up with diesel and the MPG was 47. My use of the car tends to be mostly motorway journeys to work and back (35 miles each way) so I cannot avoid some of the 'don't does' specified (avoid motorways, constant speed driving etc.).
I am drving in the 75 to 80 MPH range (70 to 75 real MPH) and still seem to be getting far better MPG than my old astra convertible, so I should not complain.

I just find it annoying that Honda can get away with advertising such MPG figures which are so unacheivable in real life driving conditions.
beeno is offline  
post #10 of 11 (permalink) Old 17th February 2008, 15:56
Supporter
 
Car: Mazda MX-5 (lightly modded)
Join Date: 1st July 2007
Location: GB GB
Posts: 15,644
Thanks: 1,166
Thanked 1,546 Times in 1,415 Posts
iTrader: (8)
Quote:
Originally Posted by beeno View Post
............

I just find it annoying that Honda can get away with advertising such MPG figures which are so unacheivable in real life driving conditions.
Thats because ALL manufacturers figures are achieved on a rolling road
They bear no resemblence whatsover to real driving.
Its only to appease regulation requirements
robbo51 is offline  
post #11 of 11 (permalink) Old 17th February 2008, 16:30 Thread Starter
** Thread starter **
 
Join Date: 26th January 2008
Location: Bournemouth ENGLAND
Posts: 6
Thanks: 0
Thanked 0 Times in 0 Posts
iTrader: (0)
Quote:
Originally Posted by robbo51 View Post
Thats because ALL manufacturers figures are achieved on a rolling road
They bear no resemblence whatsover to real driving.
Its only to appease regulation requirements
I'm sorry but I don't subscribe to the "everybody know's the figures are rubbish school."
I've been driving for 33 years now (3 diesels and lots of petrol) and have managed to get near most quoted figures. I now that the figures are obtained in an artificial environment, but they usually bear some resemblance to reality.
I really like the car and am still not too concerned with the MPG, just seems a shame that by quoting such figures it spoils people's perception of the car.
beeno is offline  
Reply

  Civinfo > Welcome > Introduce yourself

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Civinfo forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.
Your User Name is the name that appears by all your posts on the forum, and so should not be your email address.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome