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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all

I’m considering buying a 2010 1.8 Si Civic, but with automatic gears.

I didn’t realise initially the car I was viewing was automatic but I have agreed to take a look at it...then realised.

How reliable is the auto gearbox on these models? How are they to drive?

It has only covered 33k

I’ve never owned an automatic before and I’m a bit on the fence over it.

Cheers!
 

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Can't really fault ours. 106k on the clock and to me drives like a new car. Box is smooth changing and kicks down imediately given any throttle.

A lttle more thirsty than the manual. After driving my TT Audi (a good car), the more relaxed driving position, light steering, relative isolation from road noise plus the easy auto box, all make the car pretty effortless to live with if that's what appeals.
 

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Suspect you've not driven auto's? No need to do anything. Press the throttle pedal and the box changes down one or even two gears in literally an instant. In a way, the car can be driven/make quicker progress than a manual 1.8 because it finds the correct gear, where in the manual the driver has to physically select that gear. The 1.8 does'nt have a lot of torque so needs a fair bit of work with the gearbox to keep it in its 'power band'

Downside to a/the auto is that when slowing down auto boxes tend to hang on longer in high gears, thus engine braking is typically less than when driving a manual.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Believe it or not, I do occasionally drive autos’ as part of a job, but only ever really at crawling speed around a car factory.

Never been on the road in an auto so I’m not confident in my experience with them, what to look out for, reliability etc...

I’ll be honest, I’m kinda put off, I feel like I’m not going to enjoy the less sense of control.

If the car was a manual I was looking at, I wouldn’t be hesitating at all.
 

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Only answer, really is to try it. As said, can't fault ours. Replacement next year will def. be another auto.

Also as as said, a little more thirsty, 40+ on the motorway, 26/27 town driving (at least with our car !)
 

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That year model will have the 'proper' autobox and not the iShift.

I've never seen a single post here of any issues with the full autobox. I had one i my 2009 Civic and it was 1000% better than the iShift.
 

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Forgot about that one! Still nearly do it myself sometimes due to also having a manual. (using the left foot on the brake pedal thinking I'm driving a manual with a clutch pedal)
 
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Forgot about that one! Still nearly do it myself sometimes due to also having a manual. (using the left foot on the brake pedal thinking I'm driving a manual with a clutch pedal)
Using left foot on the brake when doing slow speed manoeuvres stops you "losing control" by stamping on gas pedal by mistake. If more people did it there would not be the accidents that happen when parking in particular.
 

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If your new to autos then take your left shoe off. Bare foot or sock.

It reminds you you don't need your left foot.

I've been driving autos since about 1977 and I've only ever used my right foot, as you do with a manual for the brake and accelerator.
 

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Using left foot on the brake when doing slow speed manoeuvres stops you "losing control" by stamping on gas pedal by mistake. If more people did it there would not be the accidents that happen when parking in particular.
Well, it's a point of view-if it works for those in favour, fair does. Only my experiences but never felt any compromises using the right foot as would driving a manual.
 
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The Auto in a 2010 is 'proper' old school torque converter type, it's proven tech.
very quick to drop down if you floor it to get into vtec power mode (about 5400 rpm)
it is a bit thirsty though, a mix of town/motorway driving returns about 32mpg (the dash incorrectly reads about 35 mpg)
As for your left foot, let it relax on the footrest provided and forget about it!
 

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very quick to drop down if you floor it to get into vtec power mode (about 5400 rpm)
Not in a 1.8. The 1.4 and 1.8 engines have an economy version of VTEC, not the power version of VTEC found in the 2.0 in the Type R. In the 1.4 and 1.8 VTEC is on when cruising under light engine load at 3,500RPM or less, high engine load at any time or RPM is full power mode.

You certainly will notice better acceleration at high RPM regardless though, the 1.4 and 1.8 don't produce peak horsepower until just short of the redline.
 

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I wonder what method the auto driving schools teach ?
I suspect many teach right foot only.
That is why many older drivers "lose control" if they hit the go pedal by mistake.
With no left foot covering the brake they go off like a scalded cat because they can't react so quickly and hit the brake with the right foot.
 
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