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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all, looks like I will be getting one of these but I'm trying to decide between petrol or 1.6 diesel, I'll be starting a new job in under 2 months and it's a daily drive of just over 30 miles mainly A & B roads, I think petrol will make more sense but not sure how economical they are? Any real world feedback on economy would be good. Tempted to get diesel due to zero tax and economy but not sure it's worth the extra money.....decisions decisions....any tips appreciated. I previously had a 2007 sport diesel which was great which I swapped for a crv. Will be trying the new car out at some stage I've heard the ride is a lot less harsher than my old 2007 model! Thanks all!
 

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Cost alone I'd say Petrol based on your circumstance, but the key is drive both, you may love the feel of the Diesel more.
 

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The thing to remember is that the fuel consumption on 1.8 is really driving style sensitive and can get quite high if you drive in a, so to say, spirited manner.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I'm thinking the diesel would be better, I'm not convinced the petrol would be as economical as honda claim, then again I have a petrol crv automatic and that returns about 25 mpg so anything than that would be a bonus!
 

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Either way, petrol or diesel, depreciation will out do your fuel costs!

From the mileage you give, if you buy new now with a 5yr service plan the 1.6D will probably work out best.

If the £500 5yr service plan special is off, petrol will walk it IMO.
 

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Sums are fairly simple. First you need to estimate your annual mileage

I get va genuine 61 mpg from my diesel and drive mostly fuel sapping country roads.

So for every 1000 miles. 60 mpg = 13.33 mpl = 75 ltrs @ 1.45 = £108

If a petrol does 45 mpg = 10 mpl = 100 ltrs at £1.37. = £137

So a fuel cost saving of £29 per 1000 miles.

Diesel car will cost about £1200 more but will get 50% of that back if trade in after 3 years, so £600 extra cost. Let's assume all over costs such as insurance, service, road tax balance out the same.

So we have a £600 extra cost and a saving of £29 per 1000 miles

You need to do 20000 miles during your ownership to justify the diesel.

Simple to adapt this calculation to suit your own circumstances
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Sums are fairly simple. First you need to estimate your annual mileage

I get va genuine 61 mpg from my diesel and drive mostly fuel sapping country roads.

So for every 1000 miles. 60 mpg = 13.33 mpl = 75 ltrs @ 1.45 = £108

If a petrol does 45 mpg = 10 mpl = 100 ltrs at £1.37. = £137

So a fuel cost saving of £29 per 1000 miles.

Diesel car will cost about £1200 more but will get 50% of that back if trade in after 3 years, so £600 extra cost. Let's assume all over costs such as insurance, service, road tax balance out the same.

So we have a £600 extra cost and a saving of £29 per 1000 miles

You need to do 20000 miles during your ownership to justify the diesel.

Simple to adapt this calculation to suit your own circumstances
Thanks for that, very useful!
 

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For me, the driving enjoyment of a torquey diesel will always outweight the pure financials - but YMMV.

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Unless you prefer an auto, available only with a petrol engine. That's my main issue with getting the diesel even tho cost wise it's justified twofold.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks all for your replies, I think diesel will make more sense, I do miss the tongue :) I'm not bothered about an auto, wife has the auto crv so she's happy anyway
 

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I have the petrol and have put 4k on it since getting it
Averageing 42mpg on a long run and 39/40 on shorter runs eg 10 miles to work

Deasel is a lot more fun to drive and nippy in mid range and very refined but I went for petrol as not a big mileage for me every year
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I have the petrol and have put 4k on it since getting it
Averageing 42mpg on a long run and 39/40 on shorter runs eg 10 miles to work

Deasel is a lot more fun to drive and nippy in mid range and very refined but I went for petrol as not a big mileage for me every year
Thanks for your information!
 

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Just back from test driving the diesel Tourer. I'm not sure what you mean by "more fun to drive" regarding the diesel. It's an ok car but doesn't bring a smile to your face and make you want to drive it a bit more when getting home and turning off the engine. ADAS is cool tho, saw a car coming from 20 m away when I started backing out of the parking spot.
 

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I have a 66mile a day commute on the M1 every day and get approx 45 mpg on my 8th gen Civic 2.2L diesel. When I had a 1.8L petrol on loan from the dealer I got approx 44 mpg also. Therefore I'd say it depends what you'd prefer to drive and also consider diesel is dearer to buy at the pump. Good luck.
 

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Diesel needs to get warm to clear the filter.. It takes longer time to get it warm then the petrols, also you don't get those good mileages before its warm .

That filter needs to be replaced sooner or later, that is a huge cost that petrol cars doesn't have.

So if you only drive alot of short distances go for petrols... Thats universial thing in diesel/petrol..

And also there is a bigger demand on diesel then on petrol in Europe so Diesel prices are more likely to raise.
 

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Over here diesels are usually equipped with aux heaters. When my Eberspächer broke in the middle of the winter the engine didn't get warm enough for the gauge to budge.

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With the sort of mileage you're going to cover, and assuming you want to keep the car for at least 5 years, I'd go with the diesel.

I'm in a similar situation (36 mile commute, so 72 miles a day), which is why I have the 1.6 diesel. IMID's showing 62mpg avg. I spend about £45 per week on fuel. I'm not exactly light on the right foot either... It's a fun car to drive :)

On the subject of the DPF, if your commute includes a decent motorway run you shouldn't have any trouble with it at all. I'm on the M4 for about half an hour each way. When I had my service, I asked them about the DPF. The dealership said my filter was unusually clear.
 

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With the sort of mileage you're going to cover, and assuming you want to keep the car for at least 5 years, I'd go with the diesel.

I'm in a similar situation (36 mile commute, so 72 miles a day), which is why I have the 1.6 diesel. IMID's showing 62mpg avg. I spend about £45 per week on fuel. I'm not exactly light on the right foot either... It's a fun car to drive :)

On the subject of the DPF, if your commute includes a decent motorway run you shouldn't have any trouble with it at all. I'm on the M4 for about half an hour each way. When I had my service, I asked them about the DPF. The dealership said my filter was unusually clear.

Pretty similar mileage to what I was doing and I was getting 41/42 mpg and spending £56 a week on petrol
Dieasels loosen up after 10k miles then 20k then again at 40k miles
I find dieasels are more fun to drive as I had been working in a non honda dealership temporarily and defently more poke with them for demonstration drives and selling points to customers are more mpg but the hidden costs are dieasel filter replacent when it is required
Looking at service plans for different cars dieasels seem to be exactly £200 more then petrol over a three year plan so that could be built into the equation
 

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I personally would have a petrol car unless you do over 20,000 miles a year.

I have had diesels and I do like the power delivery on some diesel cars, but the costs of keeping a diesel maintained can far out way the fuel savings.

For example I had a 2009 Golf 2.0 TDi, it was £1500 more to buy than the equivalent petrol version, and then after 6 months and 10,000 miles it needed a new DMF which would've cost circa £750 to fix. Then there is the DPF to consider should it need replacing which is £1300 and then you have a turbo bolted on to the engine too should that go wrong your looking a lot of money.

Plus servicing a diesel can be £75-100 more expensive due to the requirement of a fuel filter. So the savings really aren't very apparent. Especially in my case, where if I had of kept my Golf it'd have wiped my fuel savings for 2 years and that wasn't taking in to account the purchase price!

I from now on as a private car that I have to pay for will only own a petrol car.
 
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