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Wizard
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84 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys,

So - I'm looking at wiring up a cellink neo 6 battery up in the boot - but don't really want to hard-wire it. Plan is to use the power socket in the boot to power the battery.
The battery pulls 9 amps in rapid charging mode, and states not to use the power socket - however the power socket apparently supports up to 180W of power draw, according to the manuals.

The accessory power sockets are designed to supply
power for 12 volt DC accessories that are rated 180
watts or less (15 amps).

When each socket is being used simultaneously, the
combined power rating of the accessories should not
exceed 180 watts (15 amps)
Question is - has anyone installed anything into the power socket that pulls more around 9 amps (110W) continuously - don't want to overheat the socket.
 

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Moderator
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4,551 Posts
The socket should be fine as it is speced up to 15A. Problem might be in loading both sockets heavily, but the fuse will blow to protect the wiring.
 

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Wizard
Joined
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84 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Cool. That wouldn't be a problem as for the front socket I have a basic phone charger which I barely use anyway, and if anything else needs to be plugged in the battery can be changed to 5A mode.

Thanks for the quick reply bud!
 

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Premium Member
Joined
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940 Posts
If the WIRING heats up, resistance grows, so the AMPS being pulled will increase to give the same wattage... thus blow the fuse... so it should be protected okay. Worth just ensuring any PLUG fits neatly / tightly to prevent a poor connection in the socket.
 

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Moderator
Joined
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4,551 Posts
If the WIRING heats up, resistance grows, so the AMPS being pulled will increase to give the same wattage.
That's not 100% correct, and misleading.

If the wiring heats up, the resistance of the wire will increase (this is correct) but as the total resistance in the circuit has risen (we will assume that the load's resistance has not changed), the current will decrease not increase (basic Ohms law I=V/R). The applied voltage will remain the same so the power drawn from the supply will also reduce (P=Vsquared/R).
So given that the two sockets combined are rated at 15A and the cellink neo 6 takes 9A, that leaves 6A available for the other socket.

It is however like you say, important that the plug is a tight fit in the socket on any medium to high current feed, as any increase in resistance here can possibly cause local overheating in the socket and in the very unlikely worst case, fire (The fuse would almost certainly blow as things began to melt.
 
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