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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,

It's been a few years since I posted here, but I've been driving Civics for the past 13 years. Alas, I think my time is coming to an end. My current ride (60-plate Type-S) has recently experienced a bunch of problems which I am avoiding fixing because I'm going to get a company car in a month and wont need it.

Details: I had the brake discs and pads replaced around this time last year but apparently the caliper on one side at the back seized up and the brake has now worn down to the metal and the disc now needs replacing again, as well as the calipers. A month ago a stone went through the A/C compressor and now its not de-misting or cooling. Tax is also due at the end of this month. I also dinked it (on a hard ******* CRV, which came out with no injuries) at a T-junction the other week and it still has a dent on the drivers wing. I was going to get a mate to beat this out instead of going through insurance but haven't got round to it yet. A local garage has quoted me almost £700 for new back brake discs, pads and calipers and £400 for the A/C fix. 70k miles, its in otherwise good (but definitely used) shape. The interior is worn but not terrible, as I like to keep it clean and tidy, although my wife and daughter have different views on that!

So, my question is, do I spend four figures on fixing up the car to sell on Auto-Trader and hope its worth it, or do I sell it to a second-hand dealer who might know some people who can do the work cheaper and take a hit on the resale value? I'm only expecting to get about £1.5-2.5k at this point.
 

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Caliper seized is likely to be the slider pins, is one pad worn to the metal backing? - clean, lube & reassemble should sort it (should have been spotted & done when pads & discs were changed IMHO) - if it is the actual piston seized (unlikely imo) then I'd rebuild the caliper with new seals (+ piston if required (even more unlikely)), very very unlikely it needs new calipers - it is just easier and quicker for garages to say it needs new, after all it isn't their money they are spending - spend some of your time fixing it instead for pennies (y)

New discs, pads and the above are very easy to do yourself if you know one end of a hammer from the other.

A/C I don't know much about but the cost quoted sounds expensive to me.

Not sure I would expect to get that kind of money for a 10 year old civic in the condition yours is TBH, possibly not even if brakes & A/C were perfect - but I'm sure others have a better idea of value than me so I'm ready to be corrected there :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thanks, that sounds like an informed response.

The pad is completely gone (see photo). There are gouges on the disc and it makes a grinding noise on braking hard as of yesterday. The pad on the other side is still there.

I have no experience with working on this car myself and I have even less spare time to do this.

Is my car ready for the scrap heap then?
 

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That definitely looks like your caliper sliders are not sliding - an easy fix, but of course would need new pads & discs once the caliper is free to slide as it should. This should have been spotted and dealt with by a competent garage a year ago when your pads & discs were changed - sadly, competent (and thinking) mechanics seem to be a dying breed - almost all are parts fitters these days and often mechanically inept IMHO - this is why I do all of the work that I can on my own vehicles myself.

I'll let others comment more on the value or otherwise of the vehicle (and the worthwhileness of spending cash on it) - I'm really not up on current prices - tho I do think that when I sold my 53 plate accord with 150k on the clock and mechanically spot on for (I think) £200 2 or 3 years ago the fella that bought it got a real bargain 🤣 maybe he did maybe he didn't - I just needed it's space rather than it's company as I had already bought the Civic that was to replace it - as I say I'm not up on the values much :unsure:
 

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Oh - and also - while I would not be so bold as to recommend it - judging from that pic, I have seen far worse discs continue to be used with no ill effects - as long as they are not below min thickness I would inspect closely before I ditch them, it is likely that new pads would do just fine 👍
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The local garage I have been using said that its likely seized from disuse. I don't get out much nowadays as I've been working from home since March and we have had a few minor floods in the past months. The mechanic said they have seen other vehicles suffering from rusting and seizing due to this.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
The discs are only about 15 months/6k miles old. Perhaps just new pads and unsticking the caliper would get me through until my new car then?

How do unstick it please, is there a guide?
 

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The local garage I have been using said that its likely seized from disuse. I don't get out much nowadays as I've been working from home since March and we have had a few minor floods in the past months. The mechanic said they have seen other vehicles suffering from rusting and seizing due to this.
Umm - not in my opinion - caused by a lack of freeing up/lubrication when the pads were changed last time - I know garages generally do not do this any more it seems, but to me a proper brake job is more than just throwing pads & discs on - calipers should be checked for free movement on the slider pins and re-greased there - in addition to the dust seals and boots being checked for integrity - a few more minutes spent on maintenance pays for itself in avoiding issues like this later down the road
 

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The discs are only about 15 months/6k miles old. Perhaps just new pads and unsticking the caliper would get me through until my new car then?

How do unstick it please, is there a guide?
have a look on youtube - this is the first that my search showed just now - fella has the right idea
and another here

Mine is a 9th gen so not sure if the brakes are the same - but I imagine they are all similar. I'm sure you can find a video that will show you the whole job

Disassemble - clean with brake cleaner both the pins and their holes - dry, re-grease - I generally use red rubber grease (DO NOT use copper grease!!) but silicone is also fine I think, re-assemble and check you can slide the caliper from side to side on the pins - this is what allows the pads to centre under braking and why when they get stuck you end up with one pad worn away. Pop new pads in & your brakes should be good to go (y)

Oh - and take note of the need to rewind the rear caliper pistons (shown in 2nd Vid)

Be methodical and take your time - Brakes are not difficult and so long as you do not undo any brake lines there is no value in bleeding brakes as a general measure (when you change brake fluid as per schedule there is IMO)
 

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The discs are only about 15 months/6k miles old. Perhaps just new pads and unsticking the caliper would get me through until my new car then?

How do unstick it please, is there a guide?
If they are that "new" then they should be fine to carry on.
I agree with the various comments from Mr Hicks. Maybe another garage would be more inclined to rebuild the calipers now you are armed with more info.
A re-manufactured front caliper for my 8G TypeR is only around £80 and I have just paid £275 for new Pagid discs & pads on the rear of the 1.8 Si.
Time for a second opinion methinks
 

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To clean & lube the slider pins takes a few more minutes than changing the pads - you have the required parts disassembled to do the pads anyway - you may need new rubber boots on them to do the job properly (and I once needed new slider pins themselves on my Accord (serviced from new by Honda - go figure)) when I took over the servicing after it's plan ran out) - a good garage should be happy to do this - and should also be happy to show you the caliper moving freely on its sliders BEFORE they reassemble fully - have you got the idea that I don't trust garages much and Honda dealers even less yet 🤣 🤣

And yes - if it were me I would reuse those discs - so long as that pic is representative of the whole disc (y)
 

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Also most likely when the pads were fitted they were too big of the caliper mounts so are jammed in there. I've not fitted a set of rear pads in years that did not require a bit of fine tuning to make them fit properly. Most people do not remove the carrier and clean out the area under the anti rattle clips properly either, crud builds up under the anti rattle clips and the pads wont move back no matter how free the slider pins are.
Your issue is that your going to have to pay people to do the work. Replacing the pads for myself would cost me the cost of the pads, £25. I changed the condenser this year for the £58 the part cost and a gas recharge cost me £25.
 

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I agree Das - if you need to pay someone to do the work it soon adds up (the A/C in particular I imagine could be expensive?)
Would be handy if someone could talk with knowledge of the value of the vehicle as is and fixed to give Contayjen a better idea of how to proceed here
 

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To do rear pads you also require a Wind Back tool, they are relatively cheap off ebay though. Yes some will tell you you can do it with a pair of long nosed pliers but its not worth the hassle imo. They are cheap and will return the DIY mechanic years and years of service.

 

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Discussion Starter #15
You guys are great, thanks a million. I'm going to make an attempt on the caliper at the weekend and see if I can get it moving

In other news, my boss just emailed me about the company car. He says its coming but still no date.
 

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The caliper piston is wind in, it will not move if you try to just push it in. Without the correct wind in tool you will need to try to turn it(clockwise) and push it at the same time.
 

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As Das says, the piston winds in. A pair of long nose pliers in the recesses of the piston face should be sufficient to turn the piston, provided it's not seized. Don't let the lack of a wind back tool put you off trying.

Garages rushing and not having the time to do the job properly is the main reason I do all the work on my car myself. I know mine has new caliper boots all round and greased sliders.

Edit: I would put new discs on but I picked up some Brembo discs for £20 for my car. Pads are about the same money. Aircon rad is about £100 plus regas. Doing work on your own car saves loads but appreciate not everyone is able/willing.
 

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Yes - wind in pistons (think I cross posted there with Robbie ;)) as shown in 2nd vid above - the kits that Das supplied a link for are great and very similar to mine but the "cube" types I imagine would be fine for a one off job - as would a pair of long nosed pliers - see this video here by cjrshop - Front and Rear brake pads How To .
see 7 min 20 secs into the vid for the pliers trick (Gen 9 but principle is the same)
 

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It's a balance between your own abilities and your own wealth.

Be warned, home mechanical work always takes longer than you think. It took me two days to bleed brakes, change oil, filters, spark plugs and other random bits to a Mk5 Golf the other day. Plus if you don't have the tools then prices soon ramp up as you need the tools etc.

For me it's satisfying and you can't guarantee a mechanic will do the little things like grease every bolt before replacing or wipe down the sump etc. I'm also poor AF and all my money is spent on my child or the Alfa Romeo in the garage so I need a bit of Honda reliability :D

The Civic mk8 is a fine car for home maintenance. Honda seem to make everything relatively easy for those willing to try. Nothing I've come across so far had been any drama.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Edit: I would put new discs on but I picked up some Brembo discs for £20 for my car. Pads are about the same money. Aircon rad is about £100 plus regas. Doing work on your own car saves loads but appreciate not everyone is able/willing.
It's having the time and the equipment, and knowing its safe. If I could change the aircon rad myself that would save a lot and might be worth for resale value but I have no idea how I would get to it. Do you need some ramps to get underneath?
 
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