2006+ Honda Civic Forum banner

21 - 36 of 36 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
It's having the time and the equipment, and knowing its safe. If I could change the aircon rad myself that would save a lot and might be worth for resale value but I have no idea how I would get to it. Do you need some ramps to get underneath?
Yes it's a blend of all those things. Currently I'm about to scrap an old Mk6 Civic with one owner as it's simply not worth saving when scrap will get me £180 for the car. It will need an MoT, CV joints and other bits which simply aren't worth doing.

You'll need ramps to get under a mk8, even standard non sporty models are low. Air Con Condensers can be done yourself if the AC system is empty or you're a naughty person. It's just unbolting then replacing but there will be trim and random bolts that will be hard to reach. Plus no guarantee it's just the condenser either...Home mechanics is a can of worms and always seems to get deeper or throw spanners into the works!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
259 Posts
Yes - ramps - but many car ramps are way too steep for clearance on the front bumper of my 9th gen - is the 8th gen about the same? I use some very long ramps & even then I need several lengths of planks to walk the car up them (tho my sloping drive does not help matters).

Might be worth seeking out ramps that are known to work fine - I believe you can get ramp extenders to make the incline less steep.

The trick with home mechanics is not using the parts gun approach (like most garages do) and diagnosing to the best of your ability, and not being afraid to ask questions and get help in the right direction - just like many try to do on the forum (y) (y) (y) - it really is a great resource both in terms of what is already here and in the willingness even eagerness of members to help out :D I really hope the evil facebook empire does not kill it! not to mention VerticalScope :rolleyes: )
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
Ramps need perfectly flat surfaces, even slight inclines can mess around with getting cars on them in my experience. I needed ramp extenders too but I did force my Civic on without them once which was a bit painful for the rubber bumper flaps (it still clears the bumper itself).

Parts scatter gun approach "can" work if you are planning to keep the car for years. Although it's like the Golf I fixed up for my Dad; one of the coil packs was going and I replaced just that one. I could have done all 4 but why replace 3 perfectly working parts? Plus one of them was even an original coil pack that seemed to have been on the car since new and it was a mk5 Golf!

Honda has your back anyway as often you'll only need one or two sockets or a few screw drivers for what you're doing. I've yet to come across anything stupidly placed or hard to reach. Not like my Alfa Romeo which has a V6 in clearly an engine bay intended for 4 cylinder cars, everything is ultra tight or at strange angles...

Of all the cars I've dipped in and out of, the mk8 is one of the best for home mechanical work I've come across in recent years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter #24
Well I've had a productive DIY day having among other things fixed the hot water at home, which involved draining the heating system and replacing a valve.

With the car, I've got as far as borrowing the tools I need (no tire iron in my car, first time I checked tbh) and I got the wheel off and started on the pins. Then it occurred to me that I'm parked on my driveway, which is on a slope and I'm guessing I might need to take the handbrake off to do this work. Anyway its dark and cold now already so I'll pick it up again tomorrow.

Yes - wind in pistons (think I cross posted there with Robbie ;)) as shown in 2nd vid above - the kits that Das supplied a link for are great and very similar to mine but the "cube" types I imagine would be fine for a one off job - as would a pair of long nosed pliers - see this video here by cjrshop - Front and Rear brake pads How To .
see 7 min 20 secs into the vid for the pliers trick (Gen 9 but principle is the same)
Thanks for this, it was the one thing putting me off not having this special tool but the pliers hack seems like a decent substitute.
 

·
Clutch pedal guru
Joined
·
5,142 Posts
Just replaced BOTH rear calipers on my 2.2. Popping the piston out and cleaning up, refitting with new seals didn't fix it. Still sticking, disc too hot to touch after three miles. Sliders weren't sticking either.

Good luck getting the handbrake cable out of the bracket too. I ended up cutting the bracket with a hacksaw.

Anyway a total ballache of a job that with hindsight, would have been better getting the new calipers in the first place instead of pissing about for hours with piston and seals kits. Waste of time.

Pair of calipers are 150quid delivered new from brakes international. So just change them.

How much is it going to cost you to change your car?? Factor this into it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
It arguably costs more than paying a mechanic when you first start out doing your own work as you need to collect up a set of tools.

Things like ramps, jack stands, trolley jack, a good breaker bar, a good torque wrench, a comprehensive set of sockets, extenders, impact sockets, an oil pan, easy outs/reverse sockets for rounded bolts etc As the last thing you want is your main mode of transport to be in bits which you can't put back together and can't fix. The amount of times I've had to drive to Halfords in my Dad's car in order to get a bit I never thought I'd need too...

It can be satisfying to do your own work but it can also be very VERY frustrating. There was me the other day working on my Dad's VW Golf, I decided to try and race the incoming rain and the weather won. Was still pouring oil into the filler when it was chucking it down so hard that even the cat was looking at me from indoors wondering wtf the human was doing.

Long run it pays off, in your own satisfaction and knowledge gained. Most drivers can't even change a tyre but when you can do so much more it does open up possibilities or at the very least stops garages ripping you off!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
I'm not really surprised at that without a bead buster and balancing equipment. 🤣 🤣:love:
I know you jest I've known a few nutters to change tyres at home with blocks of wood, nudging them off the rim etc! Tyre fitting and balancing is so cheap that there's no merit in home brew jobs tho!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter #29
I'm definitely seeing how the garages have been ripping me off. Or rather, they just seem to want to fit parts, as has been mentioned.

I was getting new pads every couple of years and then when they suggested it again within a shorter period of time than usual, I questioned why this was and they came back with 'yeah, we don't actually measure them, we just estimate.' I gave them the benefit of the doubt and asked why it was so soon in case there was something else wrong. I actually spoke with the DP at the now defunct Beaconsfield dealership (very friendly guy, I had a good relationship with), when I last got my MOT in Jan and if they had told me it might be something like the calliper seizing up I might not have left them a blisteringly bad review about how they were obviously scamming.

Okay, I'm on flat ground and I have the wheel and caliper off, cleaned and silcone-lubed the pins. I've watched a bunch of youtube videos involving this process but none of them show the ideal action of the pins if they are sliding correctly. At the moment, if I push the pin in hard with the boot on, it can still stick for a while before the rubber boot can push it back. Is that level of action acceptable?

Another way to ask this question: Is it simply the springiness of the rubber boot which is responsible for the release of the brake pressure? It doesn't seem like a lot.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
Pads and discs last ages, I've had a set of brakes on a car for 3k and 6 years, still going strong. Unless you track the car or drive crazy.

Lots of garages rip off the customer on the assumption they know no better. I've been done by Kwik Fit and other places when I was younger. It pays to know what's going on, even if you describe what you want done exactly they'll think twice about bumping you. Wife doesn't help herself by saying "Just get someone to have a look at it" for both car and DIY that's a licence for them to print money.

RE your brakes, as long as the pins are cleaned and greased they should be fine. You won't know until the brakes are connected up and being used as the mechanism will restore the caliper to their position I think. Brake calipers are very robust and easy to work on items, especially front ones.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter #31
Okay cool, well it sounds like when my pads arrive on Tuesday I should be able to put them on straight and drive it. I tested the plier trick on the piston and it worked well. I'm feeling positive about this fix and its certainly better than hundreds of pounds at the local garage.

I also spoke to a neighbour's son who's even older civic was failing to start just now and I think he's going to take it off me. His dad is pretty handy at these things so I reckon he can manage changing the A/C so I'll take that off the price and its a good deal for everyone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter #32
Well well well, that went swimmingly, armed with my new knowledge and borrowed tools 😁 Spoke to neighbour's son, who said he can't afford the insurance on it (he's 22) and probably the car too, now its road-worthy. However, his dad did offer the use of his extensive tool collection including his trolley jack if I wanted to fix the other bits. The other back brake will need doing too, so I'll be sorting that on the weekend. Now wondering how easy it is to replace a wing as they appear to be only 50 quid on ebay used. Just need to find the right colour.

I feel weirdly powerful compared to a few days ago and I'm now having second thoughts about selling it. Was that supposed to happen? 😄 I can't thank you guys enough, you've really helped me turn things around.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
Good stuff that you're up and running.

Even basis mechanical work like brakes and oil changes will save you a fortune in the long run. When was the last time your brakes were bled? That's a very easy task with the right tools. Can do everything inside an hour.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
65 Posts
Discussion Starter #34
I don't think the brakes have ever been bled. Would there be any sign they need to, or is it just good maintenance to do it? In my experience you don't really find out what things need doing until they stop working or you can hear them complaining.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
175 Posts
I don't think the brakes have ever been bled. Would there be any sign they need to, or is it just good maintenance to do it? In my experience you don't really find out what things need doing until they stop working or you can hear them complaining.
Check the rear reservoir on the left hand side of the bulkhead as you're facing the car.

Honda in their wisdom split the clutch fluid and brake fluid into two separate lots whereas for a lot of cars they roll as a one.

In fact you might as well check both, if the fluid in the containers is anything other than light straw then change them. Often they go green/black and look rancid.

Clutch might provide a little hard to engage and the brakes will likely be a bit weaker but you won't notice as the process is very gradual. You will once the fluids are changed however.

Plenty of guides on here how to do it but the hardest bit is to remember you've got brake fluid flowing and need to keep it off the paint work!

I used this kit for both brake and clutch HAND VACUUM PUMP HELD BRAKE BLEEDER TESTER SET BLEED CAR MOTORBIKE BLEEDING KIT | eBay Yes it's a cheap and nasty Chinese mass production but its better than any 1 way valve or other kit I've tried for similar money.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
1,785 Posts
Brake/clutch fluid should be changed every 2/3 years regardless.
It absorbs water and loses ability to work properly, that water in the worst case can get into the ABS pump, rust it and leave you with an eye watering bill.
 
21 - 36 of 36 Posts
Top