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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One of the UK's biggest refineries has filed for insolvency. On the news, it was remarked that many of the big oil companies now no longer were involved in refineries as such. This one was owned by a Swiss company and BP was one of its biggest customers.

Greenergy, who own the big refinery at Immingham, are typical of the new type of company that owns refineries - a bedroom start up in 1992.

So, if the big companies - Shell, BP and so on, get other companies to do their refining for them, doesn't this blow the idea that they produce better fuels than the supermarkets out of the water?

Interested what others think.
 

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MY22 Jazz EX Hybrid
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I noticed a Shell garage on my way in this morning has risen by 2p since yesterday.

134.9 to 136.9 for Unleaded.

The news reports seem to think that's it's diesel that will 'spike'
 

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I can imagine Diesel spiking more, particularly as we already have not enough refining capacity for Diesel in this country. I think soon enough driving a Diesel won't be considerably more cost effective than an economical petrol...
 

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I can imagine Diesel spiking more, particularly as we already have not enough refining capacity for Diesel in this country. I think soon enough driving a Diesel won't be considerably more cost effective than an economical petrol...
Economical petrols don't have the shove of our diesel though :D
 

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Civinfo Wind Up Merchant
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Economical petrols don't have the shove of our diesel though :D

You missed off : "MUWAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA" :twisted:-[smilie=lil_red_dev:-:evil2:
 

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Don't companies like Shell send their crude oil (that they own already) to the refineries and fuel additives are added at the refinery as the company that owns the crude oil wishes. Then don't the refineries just then charge on the cost of the service to the company sending the crude oil?
 

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Don't companies like Shell send their crude oil (that they own already) to the refineries and fuel additives are added at the refinery as the company that owns the crude oil wishes. Then don't the refineries just then charge on the cost of the service to the company sending the crude oil?
This was my understanding too :popcorn:
 

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This was my understanding too :popcorn:
In which case that gives the OP the answer to his opening question.

So, if the big companies - Shell, BP and so on, get other companies to do their refining for them, doesn't this blow the idea that they produce better fuels than the supermarkets out of the water?
No it doesn't.


I have a customer who does something similiar in Wales, they have one customer who sends them slabs of steel, they then roll of the slabs into into coils and then charge the owner of the slabs of steel a fortune for the privilage. They call it "toll rolling".
 

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Bantersaurus Rex
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:( be running this thing on Veg oil before long!

I ran an old Frontera 2.8Tdi on it once, ran fine, but thats an old Isuzu agricultural engine...

Interested to see what comes as a result of this!
 

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So, if the big companies - Shell, BP and so on, get other companies to do their refining for them, doesn't this blow the idea that they produce better fuels than the supermarkets out of the water?
My other half used to work on a Tesco's forecourt and questioned the delivery driver over whether the garage around the corner got better quality fuel. His response was "that's what they like to think".

I admit though I chucked V Power Shell Diesel in my Ford passing a Shell on my commute home and I seemed to get better fuel economy. Not majorly but it was definately better.
 

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fuel

My other half used to work on a Tesco's forecourt and questioned the delivery driver over whether the garage around the corner got better quality fuel. His response was "that's what they like to think".

I admit though I chucked V Power Shell Diesel in my Ford passing a Shell on my commute home and I seemed to get better fuel economy. Not majorly but it was definately better.
the base fuel is all very similiar as the spec for each product is set by the government and each refiner will make 'tight' to critical specs to maximise production and profit. The majority of oil companies or fuel retailers like hypermarkets add fuel additives in various amounts (but not all). A proportion of this is for cleanup (a form of detergent) although it is loosely called a 'performance' additive. Some companies (like shell) have a higher octane super unleaded which is typically 99 octane versus the industry standard of 97octane for which you pay more. There are premium diesel fuels starting to come onto the market as a form of 'super' diesel but unlike super unleaded petrol which is made at 97/99 octane, the diesel is a base diesel with a performance additive included to make it 'better'. Each company will make it's own claims as to what it does but the spec for diesel (en590) is set by the government and the cetane limit (the equivalent of octane for petrol) is set therefore the majority of claims will be around cleanup of engines and fuel components. Most oil companies sell finished fuels to each other therefore the base fuel you buy could come from any one of them but under a different name and with their own additive. Hope that helps
 

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In Northern Ireland we have one major BP storage facility and they supply all supermarkets and garages including Shell with the exception of Texaco, when the different tankers come in the fill with the same octane of petrol and then each customers specific addititve is put into the tanker for mixing during transportation, up until a couple of years sainsburys petrol used shells additives so you got shell at supermarket prices.
 

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I've heard this before. That is presumably why when I did a lengthy MPG test a few years back using all sorts of petrol from different companies the results were always the same.

As a result I now use Tesco 95RON and never had an issue.
 

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fuel

I've heard this before. That is presumably why when I did a lengthy MPG test a few years back using all sorts of petrol from different companies the results were always the same.

As a result I now use Tesco 95RON and never had an issue.
exactly - however not all retail companies want to pay for the additive pack so as a minimum at least buy from someone who does. It will help keep engine components 'clean' if nothing else.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
It does all seem to come down to additives. But my point is that Shell and BP seem to have got out of refining selling these off to private investors. They have even said that they will source fuel from elsewhere. There main business seems to selling and producing crude oil.

So what you get isn't Shell Petrol or BP Petrol, it's just petrol. The additives being the main difference.

However, when you go on their websites, you could be forgiven for thinking that men in white coats carefully do research and produce a unique product. I think this is a bit of a con exposed by the Coryton business.

They just make additives.
 

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Supermarket fuels come from the same refinery as BP and Shell.
All shell and BP do is get the oil out of the ground and the refineries do the rest.
The refinery may put different additives in to the branded fuel but at the end of the day its all the same stuff.
 
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