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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all, got a split manifold on my Civic. Struggling to find a garage to do it, Honda state it's around a 5 hour job, so £60 +VAT per hour. And they could run into trouble and prolong the job at my expense. But I've heard people saying it's a 10 hour job.

I had a garage here in Leicester "Collingwood Motors" told me to leave the car with them on Tuesday at 10:30AM and it'll be done on Wednesday. Rang them up on Wednesday, didn't even begin the job and made up lots of excuses under the sun as to why they didn't do it, such as having a lift broken and their mechanic was in "Spain" and they only just found out about it. :lol: Must of thought I came down in the last rain storm. Needless to say I went straight there and took my parts and car back. Time wasters, didn't even have the decency to ring me and tell me it was on the back burner. Gloating to me two seconds after making the excuses that their other jobs are all now complete, and my car will be started on Friday, so took my car off me and wanted to have it until Friday, probably Monday as I don't see them getting work done on the weekend.

This is why I do my own work on my vehicles.

Is it hard to do the manifold? I have plenty of tools and an engine hoist. Might just crack on it myself. I ain't spending £600 in labour when I can do it myself. I lost £300+ just leaving my car with the first set of mechanics, in wages.

Anyone on here done the job and got a run through of what I need to do and expect. I won't be dropping the subframe, I'll just remove the engine from the mounts and move it with the hoist.

Edit: Honda want £605 in labour it's a 5 hour labour job. A garage in Leicester said about £360, but if they have any problems I'll be paying extra. A mechanic near me said he had one, he only charged £450 but will never touch one again. He said he spent two days on it and didn't get back a lot of the time spent on the vehicle. And I should probably do it myself.

I can see why the previous owner got shot of it. Hard to find someone to even tackle the job, I've been in touch with 10+ mechanics all of them don't want the job, or say something like can't get it in for three weeks, in other words they don't want the job.

I think the previous owner even had a crack at the job himself or stripped it all down looking if the manifold was split. Always dubious when they accept first offer way below the asking price.
 

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There is an Ebay listing for new single piece manifold for £80 and the listing stated to contact them for fitting price. They do it supplied and fitted for £300 which I thought was pretty good.

Down side is the place is in Selby so not that local.

Listing is https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/EXHAUST-MANIFOLD-REPLACMENT-HONDA-CIVIC-UFO-ACCORD-CR-V-FR-V-2-2i-CTDI-2002-2011/200975735049?fits=Car+Make:Honda|Model:Civic&hash=item2ecb165909:g:2yUAAMXQC-tTDmK3

At least they should know what they are doing.

Let us know how you get on.
 

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Bye bye Honda...
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GIANT POST ALERT!!!

Copied from the official Honda workshop manual...



Turbocharger and Exhaust Manifold Removal and Installation
Exploded View




Open the figure











Open the figure
Removal

1. Remove the engine undercover.

2. Drain the engine coolant.

3. Remove the under-cowl panel.

4. Remove the air cleaner housing assembly.

5. Remove the engine cover.



Open the figure
6. Remove the air flow tube.



Open the figure
7. Remove the two bolts (A) securing the brake fluid tank bracket.



Open the figure
8. Remove the bolt (B) securing the heat shield.

9. Remove the A/C line clamp from the bracket.



Open the figure
10. Raise the vehicle on the hoist to full height.

11. Remove the catalytic converter/exhaust pipe A assembly.



Open the figure
12. Remove the heat shields.



Open the figure
13. Loosen the bands (A) securing the turbocharger outlet hose and intercooler intake hose, and remove the intercooler intake hose (B), then remove the intercooler intake pipe mounting bolts (C).



Open the figure
14. Remove the intercooler intake pipe bracket (D), then remove the intercooler intake pipe (E).

15. Remove the turbocharger outlet hose.



Open the figure
16. Remove the intermediate shaft.

17. Lower the vehicle on the hoist.

18. Remove the three nuts (A), then remove the warm-up catalytic converter (B) from under the vehicle.



Open the figure
19. Remove the air flow pipe bracket (B), then remove the air flow pipe A.



Open the figure
20. Remove the breather hose (A) and vacuum hoses (B).



Open the figure
21. Remove the vacuum line (C) from the cylinder head cover.

22. Remove three bolts securing the cover.



Open the figure
23. Remove the sealing bolt (A) and water bypass hose (B).



Open the figure
24. Raise the vehicle on the hoist to full height.

25. Remove the turbocharger bracket (A), then remove the oil bypass pipe (B).



Open the figure
26. Remove the cover (A), then remove the exhaust joint (B).



Open the figure
27. Remove the turbocharger assembly, then seal the air inlet, air outlet, oil line hole, and water line hole with tape.

NOTE:
To avoid damaging the turbocharger.
Do not turn the actuator rod adjust nut.
Do not touch the impeller.



Open the figure
28. Remove the breather pipe (A), air flow pipe B, and water bypass pipe (C).



Open the figure
29. Remove the exhaust manifold.



Open the figure
Installation

1. Install the exhaust manifold (A) with a new gasket (B) and new self-locking nuts (C), and tighten the nuts in a crisscross pattern in two or three steps, beginning with the inner nut.



Open the figure
2. Install the water bypass pipe (A), air flow pipe B, and breather pipe (C) with new gaskets (D).



Open the figure
3. Pour new engine oil into turbocharger oil line.

4. Install the turbocharger assembly (A) with a new gasket (B).

NOTE:
To avoid damaging the turbocharger.
Do not turn the actuator rod adjust nut.
Do not touch the impeller.



Open the figure
5. Install the exhaust joint (A) with new gasket (B), then install the cover (C).



Open the figure
6. Check the bolt (A) and oil bypass pipe (B) for clogged. If they are clogged clean or replace the bolt and/or pipe.



Open the figure
7. Install the oil bypass pipe with new gaskets (C) and new washers (D).

8. Install the turbocharger bracket (E).

9. Lower the vehicle on the hoist.

10. Install the sealing bolt (A) with new washers (B).



Open the figure
11. Install the water bypass hose (C).
12. Install the exhaust manifold cover.



Open the figure
13. Install the vacuum line (A) to the cylinder head cover.



Open the figure
14. Install breather hose (B) and vacuum hoses (C).
15. Install the air flow pipe A with new gasket (B), then install the air flow pipe bracket (C).



Open the figure
16. Install the warm-up catalytic converter (A) with new gasket (B).



Open the figure
17. Raise the vehicle on the hoist to full height.

18. Install the intermediate shaft.

19. Install the turbocharger outlet hose, and align the mark (A) on the hose with the pointer (B) on the turbocharger, then secure the hose with the band.



Open the figure
20. Install the intercooler intake pipe (A) to the turbocharger outlet hose (B), then install the intercooler intake pipe bracket (C).



Open the figure
21. Loosely tighten the intercooler intake pipe mounting bolts (D). Align the mark (E) on the intercooler intake pipe and the mark (F) on the turbocharger outlet hose, and slide the turbocharger outlet hose over the intercooler intake pipe until the hose end contact the bulge (G).

22. Tighten the intercooler intake pipe mounting bolts, and secure the turbocharger outlet hose with the band (H), then install the intercooler intake hose (I), and secure the hose with band (J).
23. Install the heat shields.



Open the figure
24. Install the catalytic converter/exhaust pipe A assembly (A). Use new gaskets (B) and new self locking nuts (C).



Open the figure
25. Lower the vehicle on the hoist.

26. Install the A/C line clamp to the bracket.



Open the figure
27. Install the bolt (A) securing the heat shield.



Open the figure
28. Install the two bolts (B) securing the brake fluid tank bracket.
29. Install the air flow tube.



Open the figure
30. Install the engine cover.



Open the figure
31. Install the air cleaner housing assembly.

32. Install the under-cowl panel.

33. Install the engine undercover.

34. Refill the expansion tank with engine coolant, and bleed air from the cooling system with the heater valve open.
 

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Bye bye Honda...
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It's a big job that can turn nasty if studs break off, which is why I never bothered to replace mine when I knew it was leaking... Once it got hot you couldn't really tell and diesel exhaust fumes are nowhere near as dangerous as petrol exhaust fumes.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I have the file with pictures on the job. It's just the weather forecast for rain putting me off.

I don't mind paying the £360 labour but their reviews on Google say that they doubled the price on them with no dictum from the owner of the vehicle.

The one I have with the pictures I'll print out. It has all the information as for torque specs etc.

I'll buy a Gazebo tomorrow and crack on with it. I'm just being lazy not doing it myself. I have tools and I've done much, much more complex things on vehicles before. BMW 120D clutch and flywheel on a driveway and a Puma conversion on a Fiesta 1.25 a couple years back. And timing belts and water pumps. Word of advice only buy OEM water pumps, the cheap water pumps from euro car parts are lucky to last a year before the bearings fail. I'll be doing the one on my Civic soon as it's never been changed.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
It's a big job that can turn nasty if studs break off, which is why I never bothered to replace mine when I knew it was leaking... Once it got hot you couldn't really tell and diesel exhaust fumes are nowhere near as dangerous as petrol exhaust fumes.
They don't snap as easy as people claim. I had a 2001 Puma engine and 2001 Fiesta engine, I removed both catalytic converters from the engines and they were well older than the Civic and never had issues. Taken the headers and cats off Mercedes as well and never had an issue. If you're using a massive breaker bar and your socket isn't on correctly, then yes you can snap them easily. A lot of the times the studs will come out with the bolt.

I'd rather not have raw diesel exhaust fumes coming into my cabin. I come home after a long drive coughing my lungs up. There's carbon monoxide in diesel fumes as well.

I have a engineer that'll come out and drill & tap the exhaust studs if they snap anyway. Had him do it in an engine bay of a Mercedes A140 on the inlet manifold before, so should be a walk in the park for him on a Civic.
 

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In the meantime leave the air control on recirculation so you don't get fumes in the cabin.

Looking forward to a good write up and as I'm only in Nottingham, I'll pop it down for a manifold change once you practiced on yours. :grin2:
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
It still comes in the cabin on recirc, just not to an extent as it would.

:lol: I don't think I'll do a write up on it, it's fairly complex and takes double the time to write up and document the process with pictures. I'll probably post pictures of the exhaust manifold split.

I've pulled the beauty cover off the top of the engine and the injectors are all dry as a bone. I've looked for smoke on start up, I have none. But can smell diesel fumes as if I was stood at the back of the car with my nose to the exhaust tip under the bonnet.

I'm hoping I can move the engine with one of these: https://www.machinemart.co.uk/p/clarke-cec500ds-dual-hook-enginegearbox-suppo/ Remove the mount and swing it forward whilst moving the manifold out, if not I'll dig out my engine hoist from the shed.

I'll rather spend the £360 on tools than to line a garage's pockets that probably won't do as good of a job as I will anyway. And most of them don't honour their work with any kind of warranty.

It's a right royal PITA to find a mechanic even willing to consider the job. And the rest don't have the heart to let you know they don't want it and just say they're full for 2-3 weeks.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
If you can do a clutch, you can do a manifold
Course it's just my laziness. But I'm going to crack on with it tomorrow. I've now realised I'm missing the washers for the turbo banjo and I need to grab some washers for the coolant plug and the transmission drain.

No way are the mechanics doing a good job on my car with all the hours and work. They won't even put new fluids in, they'll just reuse the ones in there. And I see that garage with the quoted £360 doubling the price. I ain't spending £600 on labour for a £2,000 car.

I'll be down Honda on Saturday for transmission oil as I know Honda gearboxes (especially autos) hate being on anything but Honda's oil. I'll get the coolant from Parkers with my trade discount and my washers if they have them in stock, if not I'll leave the turbo banjo off until probably Monday unless Honda have them in stock, which I very much doubt. Interestingly the Honda guide doesn't have no mention of moving the engine like someone on YouTube said. But we'll see, and it'll be kept as a consideration during the job.
 

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When I attempted mine i failed im sad to say as there’s no room to get at anything on stands on a driveway. In the end i took it to an independent garage Birmingham way called midland honda specialists. A small friendly place and when i went around to see them on day 2 they had the car high up on ramps and the manifold was off but interestingly so was the front subframe and when I asked why the guy said it was almost impossible without removing it as no room to work
 

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@Lukey96 my local Honda dealer changed the manifold on my 2.2 and the mechanic said it was a bugger of a job. Moving the motor allows for extra room from above. But you'll have looked and realised what I mean...
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
It's a job for Tuesday now. I've been to Honda and ordered everything I need. They said it'll all be in on Tuesday.

I'm just going to get some seat belts cut up and use them to move the engine on my hoist. It isn't a problem for me, a bit more labour but I ain't paying for it doing it myself so it isn't an issue.

Even if I spend three days on it, I know the job is 100% done correctly and how I want it doing. Not skimping and cutting corners to do it faster and reusing all the old stuff then having constant oil leaks. Mine is a low mileage Type S example with no oil loss or leaks.

I did a rear wheel drive BMW 120D on a driveway in January of this year. It took a little longer than I'd of liked and it was a lot of cursing, but I got the job done. Most people would of caved in on the first day. I'd rather spend the labour costs back into the vehicle. I've got all the gaskets and I'll replace the turbo banjo bolts & washers. I've ordered new gearbox oil as well as I'm removing the drivers side drive shaft.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Well dropping the subframe is more hassle than it's worth removing the steering rack etc then another £40-£50 getting it tracked.

I'm just bothered about stuff needing replacing as I'm stripping, such as the engine mounts if they're cracked I'll replace them straight away and wouldn't put it back together until they arrive from Honda. It's the main hurdle with working on vehicles, you never know what needs replacing until you start messing. I try to avoid stripping stuff unless I really have to for this reason.

I'll drop some pictures when I tackle it on Tuesday. I've looked through the service manual and bought more than I should need, which is the best way. If my turbo has any oil around the intercooler etc it'll be straight down to Midlands Turbos for a full rebuild. I do all preventative maintenance whilst doing a repair on my vehicles. If I do a clutch I do the driveshaft seals and rear main seal, for example.

But the turbo doesn't make any strange noises or smoke when it's on boost or cold engine. I had a BMW with turbo seals failed smoked the whole driveway out every time I cold started it.
 

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...I've looked for smoke on start up, I have none. But can smell diesel fumes as if I was stood at the back of the car with my nose to the exhaust tip under the bonnet.weeks.
So you don't have the classic giveaway of a cracked i-CDTi exhaust manifold... are you absolutely sure that the exhaust fumes are from a cracked manifold? Mine was pretty obviously leaking on a cold start-up but I never had the serious problem with fumes getting in the cabin that you've described. Have you even taken off the heat shield and used an illuminated mirror to confirm that the exhaust fumes ARE coming from a manifold crack? It's a major job to be undertaking without a positive diagnosis!

... I don't think I'll do a write up on it, it's fairly complex and takes double the time to write up and document the process with pictures. I'll probably post pictures of the exhaust manifold split...
That's a bit mean. You're spending a lot of time posting in this thread and quite a few forum members are offering advice.

Until recently, at least, Honda were still replacing manifolds for free under goodwill. Worth asking?
 

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@Jon_G mine smelled bad with diesel fumes from around the scuttle panel area ar the back of the engine.
That's what I would expect. The leak should be obvious, given that a lot seems to be getting into the cabin and apparently even overcoming the ventilation system recirculation mode. I never suffered that, and mine emitted a pretty obvious plume of smoke from the rear of the engine on startup.
 

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Discussion Starter #20 (Edited)
@Jon_G mine smelled bad with diesel fumes from around the scuttle panel area ar the back of the engine.
The smell is a constant smell under the bonnet, it's like putting my nose to the exhaust tips whilst my head is under the bonnet.


That's what I would expect. The leak should be obvious, given that a lot seems to be getting into the cabin and apparently even overcoming the ventilation system recirculation mode. I never suffered that, and mine emitted a pretty obvious plume of smoke from the rear of the engine on startup.
I've removed the engine cover and the injectors are bone dry and there's no obvious signs of any kind of leaks, you'll see a puddle of black oily residue where the leak would be. The diesel filter etc is bone dry and the smell is worse from the back of the engine. My car doesn't have any smoke, even when I rev the engine on cold there isn't a single plume of smoke, not even white. When I first bought it on boost it'd release the odd puff of smoke, but it cleared up after a good drive. The previous owner said it had sat for two weeks without being started, and only did 4,000 miles in a year.

Also as with my other thread you can hear the turbo boost clearly like here:
People in my turbo noise thread said their's was a split manifold. I'm also putting my bets on to a split manifold rather than a gasket leak.

I'll do a little guide on how to do the job, but it won't be in-depth like a Haynes manual and I'll show what needs to be removed and what tools will be required. But I'm tackling it from above, some people might prefer to go in from underneath.

Just in parts to do this job from Honda, which is doing it all correctly renewing the gaskets etc it's a £392.57 job + £54.90 for a Gazebo, but not everyone doing this job will need a Gazebo. The car was £2,500 but haggled down to £1,900. If I get a garage to do the job it's a further £360-£600 in labour. This is why you really need to know the common faults with vehicles you buy. Rather naively I thought only the Accord suffered with this issue, I should of came on these forums prior to buying it.
My car is a very clean example with extensive service history if it was a £1,500 180K+ miles example I wouldn't bother with it. It'll be good for another 100K easily after the manifold is repaired. Currently on 105K

As for Honda doing it under warranty they more or less told me where to go, and didn't offer me any kind of goodwill.
 
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