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I've had the fn2 a while now and i had a 2.2 before it, they both had this characteristic understeer and from a bit of googling i'm thinking the FRS and some better tyres would improve this.

Got a question though, I know i might sound silly asking this but I want to hear opinions.

With a FRS, Good Tyres and possibly some suspension upgrades, will a ctr fn2 be capable of handling near too a fiesta st mk6?

I've driven a few cars but the fez was always a pleasure around corners.

The understeer can be fun, but it's more annoying at times than anything else.
 

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I've had the fn2 a while now and i had a 2.2 before it, they both had this characteristic understeer and from a bit of googling i'm thinking the FRS and some better tyres would improve this.

Got a question though, I know i might sound silly asking this but I want to hear opinions.

With a FRS, Good Tyres and possibly some suspension upgrades, will a ctr fn2 be capable of handling near too a fiesta st mk6?

I've driven a few cars but the fez was always a pleasure around corners.

The understeer can be fun, but it's more annoying at times than anything else.
The difference good tyres make really isn't ever to be underestimated, but to properly tackle this notorious issue you need to start looking at a proper geometry analysis, then make the necessary tweaks which is exactly what I'm in the middle of.

If you're local to a GRINSPEED/TGM/TDI/ABP, then go to them and they'll sort you out for a few hundred quid.

Or:

Find a decent garage with a Hunter (or similar) allignment system, and get them to give you a base reading of where your car allignment is at present. It'll look something like this:

312043


Then speak nicely to one of the above tuning shops and they'll recommend and sell you the shims you need to sort the often laughably wonky rear end that our 8th gens come free from the factory with. The readout above is mine, the rear camber is ok, but the toe is pretty crap. Shims are about a tenner each, and need to be fitted behind the stub axle - easy enough job, wheel off, brakes off, whole hub assembly off (four bolts, no need to split the hub and worry about bearings etc) and the shims sit in place, somewhat correcting the shady original angles.

Then you need a couple of camber bolts for the front, fit them in place of the upper strut bolt, then back to your allignment place for the set up. Decent places will be happy for you to set it up however you want (within the realms of adjustability) and various, very similar baseline geometry configs can be found on this site. ABP and TDI, for example have posted theirs (thanks to Syx for this post):
312044


With the analysis, parts, fitting (if you do it yourself) and final geometry setup you're looking at probably about £100, maybe a tad over.

This will probably not be quite as good as paying a pro tuning shop £300/£400 for the pleasure, but it'll be close. And you can bet it'll be a damn sight better than the standard setup.

That, is how to tackle the flighty, understeery standard handling... whether it's as good as a fezzy I can't tell you :)
 

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If you're worried about your tyres not lasting as long with negative camber. It is toe that wears out tyres. Toe in causes the tyre to scrub along as you drive, so excessive toe in is best avoided for daily road use.
 

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As said above. Get a base reading. As some Cars were bad from the factory.

I’d choose Grinspeed. And let him know how you drive. I had mine set to be as neutral as possible.

Some like more oversteer. Some even enjoy the understeer.

A diff makes a world of difference to the car. But you won’t be using it that much in the road.


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