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Glad he even mentioned to check the bolts on the front calipers were torqued.
Noticed he missed some grease on one of the tabs for a front pad - being picky here!!
Loved the boot on the wheel, initially.

Noticed there's no mention of torquing the wheel nuts - just the impact wrench - OK!!
I agree the lock nuts are a little fiddly, but if they deter would-be thieves then they work.

I suppose this is what happens when you leave your pride and joy to someone else, and you're obviously not watching - maybe I'm too green on own-car wrenching!

Informative just the same.
Al.
 

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Checking the video, good information. But I would also have look at the caliper slide pins at the same time. Sorry to see that Honda is using the same poor brake caliper as my son's old Mazda 6 from 2008. I have been working with those brakes a lot. So I know what will happen. Last time it took me several hours just to get the slide pins out.
I assume that the slide pins are still ordinary galvanized iron that will rust! I would never change brake pads, without taking out the slide pins, clean them (from rust) and check that it is no rust in the slide pin holes. After that, fill the hole with maximum amount of slide pin special grease, and they will hopefully not rust within the next year. Because if they rust, it is a hell to get the pins out.
Maybe this is a bigger problem in salty Swedish winter roads, but if I compare to Volvo, they use stainless steel pins. It is a reason for that.
 

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My 9g tourer used to eat the rear pads, they lasted about 15,000 miles, then i thought i did use the cruise control hell of a lot, and that was the problem, apparently when using cruise control the rear brakes are applied to keep the car at a steady required speed.
 

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Fidsey, I just wan't to inform you that the cruise control can not apply any brakes. It has no affect to brake wear.
That's wrong on the UK 10G.
It has ACC (Adaptive Cruise Control) which maintains a set distance from the car in front. If the car in front slows down, the ACC brakes your car to maintain the distance (actually following time). On the auto, it has Slow Speed Follow which will brake the car to a standstill and get it going again when the car in front pulls away.
You cannot turn OFF the ACC so that you have a 'normal' cruise control.

The Collision Mitigation Braking (CMB) and the Road Departure Mitigation (RDM) features will also brake the car as will the Stability Control.
 

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Having studied the Youtube video, I set about changing the front pads on my '19 plate 1.0T SR, only to find that it has different callipers to those in the video o_O

This is the one from the video :-

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and this is mine :-

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To remove the pads, there are two 7mm Allen bolts that have to be removed - hiding under plastic caps. (These were torqued to about 28Nm).

Both bolts need to be physically removed; the calliper will not 'swivel' on one of them. They need to be removed to be cleaned up anyway, unlike the ones in the video, these are the sliding pins.

I had a bit of difficulty getting enough free play to pull the calliper apart - it was a matter of pulling the whole assembly, to compress the piston slightly, combined with a bit of front and back levering. (It was so tight, I was concerned that there was another hidden bolt somewhere - but there wasn't)

The spring arrangement at the side was an absolute sod to get back in. It seems best to put it into the holes first and then manoeuvre the rest of it into place, using mole grips.

Something worthy of note, is the fact that the pads slide directly on the calliper body - there are no shims! (I have never come across this before, but as far as I'm aware, this is how the car left the factory). They proved quite fiddly to clean up.

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The pad nearest the piston has three huge spring clips, that locate inside the piston 'hollow' - again, different to the ones in the video.

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Hi, is this easy for a diyer like myself. Can't seem to find any videos on this?
There are lots of youtube videos out there - but I can't find any that specifically cover the UK 10G Civic's Front Brakes. But conceptually, all you're doing is removing two 'bolts' that the pads slide on, pushing the piston back in and then re-assembling. A spot of cleaning and re-greasing (with high-melting point brake grease) is also in order.

On the subject of "pushing the piston back in", if the brake fluid has been topped-up or changed, there will be insufficient room in the reservoir to contain it all. The excess will need to be removed (I used a tiny little syringe, that came from the vets!). Note: cleanliness is next to godliness, when it comes to brake fluid - do not introduce any contaminants into the system (and don't spill it on your paint work).

The rear brakes are slightly different because of the handbrake mechanism. (I've never tangled with disk brake handbrakes before). There is some sort of auto-adjuster in there that rotates as it operates and the conventional means of resetting it, seems to be a 'piston wind-back tool'. Because our cars have an electric motor that performs this job, it can be removed from the back of the caliper and be turned manually. The piston can then be pushed back in as normal.

I found a Youtube video that demonstrates this procedure.

(He also changes the disk itself, so you can skip that part). (The rear brakes in that video have the same 'hidden' 7mm hex bolts and spring arrangement, that I found on my front caliper).

 

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I just checked my rear pads, using the previous video as a guide. I ran into a slight problem; the routing of the brake pipe means there is insufficient room to use a hex socket :-

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I note also, that part of the 'sliding pin' is exposed (surely there should be a rubber boot there) and the thread on the end is also exposed to the elements. Corrosion on the thread, meant that the bolt had to be undone (using an allen key), ¼ of a turn at a time :(.

Since the guy in the Youtube video had no problem undoing the sliding pins, I did a compare-and-contrast to figure out why. It turns out that my brake pipes run in the opposite direction to his!.
(It's not easy to directly compare, since the video shows a left-hand brake and I was working on the right-hand).

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Like the front caliper, it was not easy to pull the assembly away from the disc, without first pushing the piston in slightly. Of course, to do this properly, the motor needs to be taken off and the mechanism turned. Catch 22 :eek: It took the application of a pair of Fat Max clamps to the external housing to get the requisite amount of slack.
 
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