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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have a 2010 Civic Si 1.8. The alloys are rated for 225/45 R17 91Y tyres.


I want 2 front Michelin CrossClimate+ 225/45 R17 94W tyres.
Could the lower speed rating from Y to W affect insurance or MOT? I'm with Elephant at the moment (rotate between Elephant, Diamond and Admiral depending on which is the cheapest at the time). They only mention actual car mods in the documents; nothing about tyres is mentioned.


Also, is it worth getting tyre tracking done at the same time? I had this done last year.
 

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Out of interest why do you only want two front tyres and not rears? In my opinion it would be an unsafe setup especially if driving in wintry conditions. Imaging the rear of the car breaking traction sending the vehicle into a spin because the rear has inferior grip to the front.

From an insurance standpoint I wouldn't envisage any issues assuming you have the same type of tyres on both axles.
 

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I agree that it would be a waste to throw them out, possibly try and sell on eBay?

I know that the general consensus is that it's unsafe to have winters on one axle and summers on the other. Obviously summers on one and all seasons on the other isn't as bad but could still cause issues in bad weather.

I was looking at the same size Michelin's earlier and they are expensive. Twice the price of a set of Goodyear F1 assymetrics. That being said they are supposedly good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Anyone know if lower speed rated tyres will cause an MOT fail though..? I see different answers everywhere I look :/
As for insurance, I'm going to send them an email now. Better to have something written.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Just remembered the official top speed of the car is something like 130mph anyway, so having W (168mph) rated tyres should really be fine for everything...
 

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Ive seen the video's, read the reasoning, but I will always put the "grippiest" tyres on the front of a FWD car because all the traction, braking and steering goes through the front. Imagine for a moment you just put two new tyres on your car and the reasoning says new tyres on the back. So ive now got 3mm on the front and 8mm on the back. Wet braking will suffer, Aquaplaning is now a huge issue. Some say understeer is the safest option, but for who? Id rather oversteer backwards through a hedge than slide head first into a tree. In a FWD car oversteer is far more controllable as you still have full use of the throttle, brakes and steering, where as understeer basically only leaves you with the brakes to play with, or at best lift off the throttle(which can then invoke oversteer). I see no reason to put the new tyres on the back. There is a reason that high mileage is attainable from tyres on the back of a FWD car, they do very little.
 

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It's simply because understeer is the safest, easiest condition to correct - With the least gripping tyres at the front, if they do lose traction, you've got a number of control options to regain traction - Ease off steering, power or brakes or a combination thereof. If the rear lets go, you've got to countersteer out of the skid - the only control that soley applies to the rear is the handbrake, which will do little good if they've lost traction.

If you've put your 8mm Tread wheels at the front, and 3mm wheels at the back, and you're on a soggy motorway and need to panic brake, the rear tyres will be unloaded and less able to clear water, leading to them locking before the front wheels - uh oh!
is a good example
 

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But with ABS how would the back lock up? And again with 3mm on the front the braking distances are lengthened straight away. Sorry its the new tyres on the front for me everytime.
 

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The natural thing that inexperienced drivers do in the case of either under or oversteer is to lift off. Just the job in a RWD but not so in a FWD in the case of understeer. Front digs in and back goes round.
Having said that, Das puts up a damn strong argument for new on the front, as heavy breaking is a much more likely scenario than an over/understeer situation unless you drive like a racing driver. >:)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 · (Edited)
Quickly going back to the original question about using lower speed rated tyres (in case anyone else worries about this), blackcircles responded to my email:


"With a winter tyre and All season tyre you are permitted to drop a speed rating by 1. So fitting a W rated tyre will be suitable to be fitted to your vehicle."


As for fitting new tyres in front or back... I'm not too bothered as long as both have 4mm+ tread... That's what's most important!
 

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Any tyre should be used at max legal speed which is 70mph ? so dont mind rating to much. In regards crossclimates+ have same tyres for few months now and so far feels good and confident. But i bought all 4 and sold rears. Tyres needs to be swapped rear with fronts every year or two to keep them wearing evenly. Check if rear ones dont have cracks in rubber as with age it losses its grip and performance even you have plenty off mm left in it...
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Thanks for the responses. I ordered them yesterday but now I'm thinking. I live in London and go down the A3 to Guildford once every 2-3 weeks (25 mile trip). Is it worth keeping all season tyres or should I just swap out to decent summer tyres? Summers are getting warmer and I doubt this freeze will more than 2 months...
 

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But with ABS how would the back lock up? And again with 3mm on the front the braking distances are lengthened straight away. Sorry its the new tyres on the front for me everytime.
I'd always been with you on this one (best tyres on the front) but the evidence for doing it the other way is pretty strong. I guess if you're a handy driver and know how to deal with oversteering car and do so instinctively (most drivers don't have a clue) then the decision is maybe less critical.

TBH i would never want to have 8mm tyres on one end and 3mm on the other if i could avoid it - my strategy is always to rotate so you never have such a big disparity front/back.
 

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I would be very reluctant to mix 2 different types of tyres on the same car. Winter tyres offer significantly more grip than all season, thus you will be seriously unbalancing the car in harsh conditions.

Also, I take it you are aware that you cannot run winter tyres in summer because they overheat, so as soon as the whether warms up in April, you'll have to buy 2 new tyres for the front. For this reason the usual set up is to buy 4 extra wheels with winter tyres and change all 4 wheels over for winter and then back again in the spring. If you can't afford to do this, as many including myself can't, then you can't run winter tyres. You can pay to have them changed on the rims, but then you risk damage to the tyres from the repeated removal process and even that's not going to be so cheap when at least twice a year.

My advice would be if you're only getting two tyres, buy 2 more all season. 7mm on the back is practicality new, so it makes sense to fit the same as the rear again as they'll probably wear out at the same time as fronts wear faster, although brand should be less of an issue if all season. If you can afford 4, go winter but bear in mind that the tyres will have to be swapped for summer be it on the same rims or more preferably on spares.
 

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I would be very reluctant to mix 2 different types of tyres on the same car. Winter tyres offer significantly more grip than all season, thus you will be seriously unbalancing the car in harsh conditions.

Also, I take it you are aware that you cannot run winter tyres in summer because they overheat, so as soon as the whether warms up in April, you'll have to buy 2 new tyres for the front. For this reason the usual set up is to buy 4 extra wheels with winter tyres and change all 4 wheels over for winter and then back again in the spring. If you can't afford to do this, as many including myself can't, then you can't run winter tyres. You can pay to have them changed on the rims, but then you risk damage to the tyres from the repeated removal process and even that's not going to be so cheap when at least twice a year.

My advice would be if you're only getting two tyres, buy 2 more all season. 7mm on the back is practicality new, so it makes sense to fit the same as the rear again as they'll probably wear out at the same time as fronts wear faster, although brand should be less of an issue if all season. If you can afford 4, go winter but bear in mind that the tyres will have to be swapped for summer be it on the same rims or more preferably on spares.
Michelin crossclimate's *are* all season tyres i believe. :)
 
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