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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

Just got a used 2012 9th Gen 2.2 idtec on 114,000 miles and already put a good few thousand miles on it. The car, engine, gearbox feel like new and couldn't be happier with the performance. I'm planning to do my own oil changes but Honda's 12,500 miles oil change recommendation seems a bit too long between changes. Mind you the previous owner had serviced it every 15,000 to 16,000 miles, and yet the engine feels like new not a drop of oil being burned since I did the oil few thousand miles ago.

Any thoughts on oil change intervals?

Thanks
 

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Yeah. 12,500 miles as per the book. Or more often if you feel like/worry about it.
Seems that it was happy at 15/16k for 100,000 miles, so should be even happier at 12.5k:grin2:
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Thanks both for the replies!


After doing a bit of digging and finally contacting local Honda dealer, I was told 12,500 miles or once a year, whichever comes first - same as the service book.


On first look 12,500 miles seems a lot but to clock that many miles in a year one has to be doing quite a bit of motorway driving, which allows the oil to get to the right temperature and evaporate contaminants such as fuel molecules. Also, 5.5 litters of oil could run more miles before it gets contaminated compared to let’s say an engine that only takes 3.2 litters. We can see service intervals for Merc, BMW, Jaguar of 15,000 miles with their engines taking between 5-6 litters on oil change.
You may have noticed I've only mentioned oil contamination and nothing about oil breakdown, and that's because it would take a lot more than 12,500-15,000 miles for a full synthetic oil to break down. According to a lab study (non-official) it takes around 50,000 miles for a full synth to start breaking down. Major factor when it comes to oil changes is oil contamination and that's why it has to be done at least once a year regardless of millage.

In saying all this the dealer did emphasize that the correct oil is a must, in this case SAE 0W-30 with ACEA specs C2/C3. Brand is not that important but different brands must not be mixed when changing the oil (example 2 litters Castrol and 3.5 litters Mobile1) because of different additive packages used that could cancel each other by various chemical reactions when mixed. Another extremely important thing is to use good quality filter because it's job is to filter down all the dirt and tiny metal particles from normal engine wear, and you guessed it, any other contaminants. By saying a good quality filter do not mean only Honda oil filter, other good brands such as Bosch would filter just as good. (Off topic, when it comes to fuel filter people swear by Genuine Honda Fuel Filter but Bosch is just as good if not better, and if you pop your bonnet open I'd ask you to check who manufactures your direct fuel injection system, hint: Bosch)




I argued that a turbo charged engine would need more frequent oil changes because of the heat produced by the turbo and the need for high pressured easy flowing oil lubricating the turbo's bearings. The response was - in general diesel turbos do not produce anywhere near the heat produced by petrol turbos and that's why they only need oil for lubrication and cooling but unlike other diesel engines the 2.2 i-dtec has a water-cooled turbo, so it uses oil for lubrication and oil and coolant for cooling which dramatically reduces the operational temperature of the turbo, and this slows down oil and oil additives break down making the oil last more miles between changes. But surely Honda wouldn’t spend £thousands to add water-cooled turbos instead of the cheaper oil cooled turbos just to add a couple of thousand miles between oil changes, which would also hurt their profit coming from servicing vehicles, so I had to challenge that as well.
Well, apparently water-cooled turbo was fitted in this engine to allow for an automatic stop-start engine system to be used in the design. And believe it or not the reason for it wasn’t to save you a few £ on fuel every time you stop at a traffic light but to reduce bad emissions in compliance with Euro 5 Emission Standards.
Now the problem with oil cooled turbos when it comes to stop-start engine systems is that when the engine is cut off the oil supply to the turbo stops. Imagine going on the motorway at high speeds where the turbo gets really hot and then you pull at a junction to find yourself stopping on a red light in the roundabout – at this point due to the heat of the turbo the small amount of oil left in the bearings will most likely get cooked and firm up, with time this cooking of the oil blocks those tiny passages leading to bearings failure/ turbo failure. Not only that but the heat generated by the exhaust side of the turbo can’t be dissipated through the oil once the engine has stopped and gets drawn into the central shaft of the turbo, which is not meant to handle the same heat as the exhausted side of the turbo, and this reduces its life.


“When it comes to water-cooled turbo it is true that during normal engine operation water flows through the turbocharger mostly due to pressure created by the engine’s water pump. However, an additional phenomenon known as “thermal siphoning” pulls water through the turbo’s centre housing if the water lines are properly routed, even after the engine is shut off and the water pump is no longer pumping. Heat in the centre housing is transferred to the water via conduction, like the cooling effect that occurs inside a typical water-cooled engine (with a water jacket surrounding each cylinder and running through the cylinder head). If the water running through a turbocharger is allowed to escape freely after absorbing heat, it will rise through the cooling system pulling cooler water into the turbocharger along with it. In this way the intense heat that has soaked back into the turbo after engine shutdown is wicked away from the bearings and seals, and prevented from causing serious damage without assistance from the engine’s water pump.”
All this extends the life of the turbo and allows the use of stop-start technology, as well as allowing the oil to last 12,500 miles instead of 10,000 miles between services.

After my small research I’m planning to change it every 10,000 miles or once a year because I’m doing it myself and I like round numbers. Now I’ll stop writing before my fingers start bleeding.

Hope this gives a piece of mind to other people like me unsure of oil change interval on 2.2 idtec


Kiko
 

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my old 2.2 had 185000 on it when I changed
I bought it with less than 40 k on it
use quality oil and all should be fine
I changed my oil every February which will have been over the recommended millage sometimes by a fair bit
I only ever used castrol edge 0 w 30 and always changed oil filter with genuine filter
 
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