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Discussion Starter #1
I'm planning on fitting some braided brake lines at the weekend and was wondering if anyone knows whether the caliper bleed screw caps would be suitable for temporarily plugging the brake hard lines?

If not, can anyone suggest a suitable alternative?

Apologies if this has been asked previously; I have attempted to search for an answer, but couldn't see anything.

Thanks.
 

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Cant help you with regards to your question, but i want to change mine myself too. Is there any chance of taking a few pics and writing a brief how to? Im sure i heard if you wrap the top of thhe brake fluid tank with cling film and screw the cap back on hardly any fluid will escape the lines does that sound right?
 

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I don't know anything technical, but if you are replacing the lines why not add upgraded fluid, that way you can just drain all your fluid and not worry about keeping the old stuff in the tank.
 

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Draining the fluid is a bad idea unless you want to remove the ABS block and master cylinder and prime them with oil.
I couldnt undo the hard lines without knackering the nuts... so had to go in the garage in the end.
 
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Discussion Starter #5
Happy to attempt a how-to. I was planning on taking some pictures as I go anyway, plus it's the least I can do given how helpful this forum has been already. :)

The cling film trick should work in principle as it will help prevent any additional air entering the reservoir. Once some fluid has escaped initially this should lead to a reduced pressure in the reservoir relative to ambient, causing the remaining fluid to be retained.

Cant help you with regards to your question, but i want to change mine myself too. Is there any chance of taking a few pics and writing a brief how to? Im sure i heard if you wrap the top of thhe brake fluid tank with cling film and screw the cap back on hardly any fluid will escape the lines does that sound right?
Dave, I do have some Motul RBF600 fluid to replace what's in there now and was planning to empty the whole system as you suggest. However, my dad then claimed it would be best to try and leave a little of the old fluid in the reservoir when bleeding the new through.

I have noticed that on some vehicles there can be complications with the ABS, not sure if this is the case with the Civic and whether it would be exacerbated by emptying the whole system.

If someone can confirm that emptying the brake system will have no adverse effects I may well do that.

I don't know anything technical, but if you are replacing the lines why not add upgraded fluid, that way you can just drain all your fluid and not worry about keeping the old stuff in the tank.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Relic, you snuck in there as I was typing my other reply!

Part of the reason for doing it myself is I was going to remove the calipers too to give them a coat of paint.

I'll still give it a go – without draining the whole system – and see how I get on. Maybe I'll have to take it to the garage too.

Draining the fluid is a bad idea unless you want to remove the ABS block and master cylinder and prime them with oil.
I couldnt undo the hard lines without knackering the nuts... so had to go in the garage in the end.
 

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You can still use a hose clamp with the steel braided hoses / flexible lines ;)
I would have made sure the master cylinder cap was airtight and then removed the hoses like you.
But even then I'd swap out the lines ASAP, replace/bleed one at a time as Im a worryer like that
:D
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I had a go at fitting some HKS braided lines today. I have installed the four main hoses that run from the hard line to each caliper; it took ~ 30 minutes each corner (I was taking my time as this was a first for me!). Once the lines were on I then flushed the brake system with some new Motul RBF600 fluid, which took approximately another hour. The existing fluid was relatively fresh, so it was virtually impossible to tell old from new. I used a litre to try and ensure only new fluid remained in the system.

Overall it was a relatively straight forward job. I think anyone who's reasonably comfortable with a spanner should have no problems. An extra pair of hands is always useful, but not essential – except for bleeding the brakes, if you go the old fashioned pedal pumping route as I did. Fortunately my dad was on hand throughout.

I have the six line kit and hope to fit the remaining block and hoses next weekend – part of the reason for not doing it today is it took a while to figure where they actually go! Once these are fitted I'll complete a how-to guide that will hopefully help anyone else contemplating doing this themselves.

Until the how-to is done, a few tips:
1. To answer my own question, the bleed caps are perfect for temporarily plugging the hard lines! :)
2. As mentioned by Relic, be very careful with the hard line nuts. I initially tried a typical open spanner, but could tell the nut was starting to round. Based on my experience a 10 mm flare spanner is a must. Fortunately I was able to get one from my local Halfords. From then on it was a straight forward job.
3. A large spanner (~ 1 inch, from memory) or vice would be useful for holding the blocks when removing them from/attaching them to their mounting bracket (to ensure sufficient torque).
4. There are some small clips securing the rear hoses. These are relatively easy to lever out with a screw driver or similar, but will likely need to be gently tapped back in place using a hammer. I also used a small metal rod held atop the clip, rather than striking it directly, to avoid catching adjacent objects.

If people have any questions in the mean time I will do my best to help.
 

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I had a go at fitting some HKS braided lines today. I have installed the four main hoses that run from the hard line to each caliper; it took ~ 30 minutes each corner (I was taking my time as this was a first for me!). Once the lines were on I then flushed the brake system with some new Motul RBF600 fluid, which took approximately another hour. The existing fluid was relatively fresh, so it was virtually impossible to tell old from new. I used a litre to try and ensure only new fluid remained in the system.

Overall it was a relatively straight forward job. I think anyone who's reasonably comfortable with a spanner should have no problems. An extra pair of hands is always useful, but not essential – except for bleeding the brakes, if you go the old fashioned pedal pumping route as I did. Fortunately my dad was on hand throughout.

I have the six line kit and hope to fit the remaining block and hoses next weekend – part of the reason for not doing it today is it took a while to figure where they actually go! Once these are fitted I'll complete a how-to guide that will hopefully help anyone else contemplating doing this themselves.

Until the how-to is done, a few tips:
1. To answer my own question, the bleed caps are perfect for temporarily plugging the hard lines! :)
2. As mentioned by Relic, be very careful with the hard line nuts. I initially tried a typical open spanner, but could tell the nut was starting to round. Based on my experience a 10 mm flare spanner is a must. Fortunately I was able to get one from my local Halfords. From then on it was a straight forward job.
3. A large spanner (~ 1 inch, from memory) or vice would be useful for holding the blocks when removing them from/attaching them to their mounting bracket (to ensure sufficient torque).
4. There are some small clips securing the rear hoses. These are relatively easy to lever out with a screw driver or similar, but will likely need to be gently tapped back in place using a hammer. I also used a small metal rod held atop the clip, rather than striking it directly, to avoid catching adjacent objects.

If people have any questions in the mean time I will do my best to help.
Lol I wish you had done this a few weeks back:) I had tdi south fit my 6 line kit. Just didn't wanna risk it with the brakes:( you won't be disappointed transforms the braking even with standard discs pad combo
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Sorry about that! :)

Yes, even with just the 4 hoses fitted so far overall bite is improved (with standard discs and pads). They also feel more linear now so less travel is required to achieve the same braking force as before. Hopefully I'll see a further improvement when I fit the remaining block and hoses.

I also have some Cosworth StreetMaster pads to fit at some point (front and rear).

Lol I wish you had done this a few weeks back:) I had tdi south fit my 6 line kit. Just didn't wanna risk it with the brakes:( you won't be disappointed transforms the braking even with standard discs pad combo
 

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I had a go at fitting some HKS braided lines today. I have installed the four main hoses that run from the hard line to each caliper; it took ~ 30 minutes each corner (I was taking my time as this was a first for me!). Once the lines were on I then flushed the brake system with some new Motul RBF600 fluid, which took approximately another hour. The existing fluid was relatively fresh, so it was virtually impossible to tell old from new. I used a litre to try and ensure only new fluid remained in the system.

Overall it was a relatively straight forward job. I think anyone who's reasonably comfortable with a spanner should have no problems. An extra pair of hands is always useful, but not essential – except for bleeding the brakes, if you go the old fashioned pedal pumping route as I did. Fortunately my dad was on hand throughout.

I have the six line kit and hope to fit the remaining block and hoses next weekend – part of the reason for not doing it today is it took a while to figure where they actually go! Once these are fitted I'll complete a how-to guide that will hopefully help anyone else contemplating doing this themselves.

Until the how-to is done, a few tips:
1. To answer my own question, the bleed caps are perfect for temporarily plugging the hard lines! :)
2. As mentioned by Relic, be very careful with the hard line nuts. I initially tried a typical open spanner, but could tell the nut was starting to round. Based on my experience a 10 mm flare spanner is a must. Fortunately I was able to get one from my local Halfords. From then on it was a straight forward job.
3. A large spanner (~ 1 inch, from memory) or vice would be useful for holding the blocks when removing them from/attaching them to their mounting bracket (to ensure sufficient torque).
4. There are some small clips securing the rear hoses. These are relatively easy to lever out with a screw driver or similar, but will likely need to be gently tapped back in place using a hammer. I also used a small metal rod held atop the clip, rather than striking it directly, to avoid catching adjacent objects.

If people have any questions in the mean time I will do my best to help.
Excellent work mate. I'm doing mine tomorrow, so all this info will come in handy. I have the Do-luck six line kit, if four of the hoses go from the hard lines to the caliper, where do the other two lines go? I've not even looked at where they go, was assuming it would be fairly obvious once I have removed the wheels :confused:

I'm also changing the front discs and pads so was reckoning about 5 hours work doing it myself?
 

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I did the hoses on my M3 a few months ago and the red caps that were on the hoses when I got them can be used to stop fluid draining from the copper brake pipes and stop dirt getting into the calipers.

Also one of nuts was on way too tight and wouldn't budge without starting to round off - my Dad happened to have a self adjusting wrench similar to this but smaller which tightens the more pressure you put on it and it worked a treat - STANLEY hand tools self adjusting spanner, 17-24mm. | eBay UK
 

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Discussion Starter #13
I thought the same! The two remaining lines go under the chassis, just inside of each rear wheel. The nearside rear hose connects a hard line point to a block, whilst the off-side simply joins two hard line points.

To fit them you will need to be able to get under the car safely – I do not suggest trying this using just a jack. Fortunately for me my dad has a couple of ramps that should do the trick.

5 hours sounds about right to me. I certainly wasn't rushing when I did it and recommend you make sure you have plenty more time than you think you'll need.

Excellent work mate. I'm doing mine tomorrow, so all this info will come in handy. I have the Do-luck six line kit, if four of the hoses go from the hard lines to the caliper, where do the other two lines go? I've not even looked at where they go, was assuming it would be fairly obvious once I have removed the wheels :confused:

I'm also changing the front discs and pads so was reckoning about 5 hours work doing it myself?
 

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Discussion Starter #14
A self adjusting wrench is a good idea. My dad also has one, but seeing as it's as big as my arm it wasn't an option! :)

I did the hoses on my M3 a few months ago and the red caps that were on the hoses when I got them can be used to stop fluid draining from the copper brake pipes and stop dirt getting into the calipers.

Also one of nuts was on way too tight and wouldn't budge without starting to round off - my Dad happened to have a self adjusting wrench similar to this but smaller which tightens the more pressure you put on it and it worked a treat - STANLEY hand tools self adjusting spanner, 17-24mm. | eBay UK
 

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I thought the same! The two remaining lines go under the chassis, just inside of each rear wheel. The nearside rear hose connects a hard line point to a block, whilst the off-side simply joins two hard line points.

To fit them you will need to be able to get under the car safely – I do not suggest trying this using just a jack. Fortunately for me my dad has a couple of ramps that should do the trick.

5 hours sounds about right to me. I certainly wasn't rushing when I did it and recommend you make sure you have plenty more time than you think you'll need.
Thanks for that. I now know what to be looking out for. I'm planning on taking my time so I hopefully won't run into any problems. I also have my axel stands at the ready :)
 

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Well, job done :) It took about 5 and a half hours in total for all six lines and front discs and pads. It all went relatively smoothly apart from the offside front hose. The nut on the hard pipe to the distribution block was completely seized and would not budge without the use of a blow torch. Well done on the recommendation to get a 10mm flare spanner, you most definitely wouldn't have been able to do the job without one. I'm really pleased with the results even if I do have sore hands and an aching back after lying on the ground for 5 hours :p
 

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:thumbsup:
Check it once a week for a month to make sure you get no fluid leaks at the joints ;)
Mine were installed at the garage and the hardline on the nearside wasnt seated in the block properly.
Had to undo the nut a bit, pull the hardline away from the block and retighten to seat it right.
 

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:thumbsup:
Check it once a week for a month to make sure you get no fluid leaks at the joints ;)
Mine were installed at the garage and the hardline on the nearside wasnt seated in the block properly.
Had to undo the nut a bit, pull the hardline away from the block and retighten to seat it right.
I'll be sure to keep an eye on brake fluid level and check the joints for leaks. I doubled checked everything at the time but you can never be too safe ;)
 

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Keep an eye on fixing

Hi there,
I've faced a problem when mounting the HKS hoses: the front right moved on the fixing piece (the one that is in the shock) making the hose touch the suspension and even the disk.... the result was a cut line and no brakes at all....
After making a examination the fault was: Hks lines are longer than the original and the fixing is not tight enough to "fix them" in the place you let them after fitting. I changed the 2 fronts to Goodridge and the fixing "fixes" ok.
Keep an eye on that...
Cheers
P.S.: Sorry for my english.... I write from Spain.... Nobody is perfect:cool:
 

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Hi there,
I've faced a problem when mounting the HKS hoses: the front right moved on the fixing piece (the one that is in the shock) making the hose touch the suspension and even the disk.... the result was a cut line and no brakes at all....
After making a examination the fault was: Hks lines are longer than the original and the fixing is not tight enough to "fix them" in the place you let them after fitting. I changed the 2 fronts to Goodridge and the fixing "fixes" ok.
Keep an eye on that...
Cheers
P.S.: Sorry for my english.... I write from Spain.... Nobody is perfect:cool:
Your English is great matey :) the Do-Luck lines are also slightly longer than stock at the front but they are kept in place by a bracket that fixes into the same location as the stock one so the lines don't move about :)
 
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