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Discussion Starter #1
Hi guys, my FK3 is currently not starting.
A week or so ago the EML came on, no driving issues at all,and then went off the next morning. Then it reappeared this weekend but went into limp mode of some sort. And finally now it won't start. I've got the VSA, airbag and seatbelt light I think on the dash.
I've had code readers on it and also done the foil trick to clear the faults and 1 fault remained... B1168.
I've just had it looked at today by my local mechanic and the gauge module (speedo cluster?)has lost communication with the PCM/ECM module.
So I'm a bit lost as to where to start?
Do I look for another speedo cluster and or PCM and does that need coding to the car? Where to get the bits I need?
And what's caused it??
Thanks.
 

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What was the code that you deleted? Particularly any sort of P-code that could explain the bout of limp mode!

I'd be wanting to check that the under dash connectors were all properly engaged before replacing the ECU.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
With a friends code reader the faults (maybe historic) were... P0335 CKP sensor A Circuit Performance..
P1031 Heated Oxygen Sensor (HO2S) Heater Current Monitor Control Circuit banks 1 and 2 Sensor 1.
P1237 Injector Circuit Cylinder 6 Intermittent.

I tried the foil trick and I got
PA50 B1168. PA51 1235, PA51 1240, PA51 1241. I reset these and B1168 wouldn't clear.

Then the RAC guy's laptop wouldn't communicate with the PCM and a 2nd opinion from my local mechanic's Snap On tool brings up that the gauge module has lost communication with the PCM.

Engine will crank but not fire.
Any help in pointing me in the right direction will be greatly appreciated as I don't have a car right now so I need to get cracking on it.
 

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Confusing set of p-codes when you don't have an oxygen sensor and no cylinder 6!

Yes, P0335 is a crankshaft position sensor wiring fault... OBD II Fault Codes p0335

P1031 is actually a fuel heater fault, possibly the wiring... OBD II Fault Codes p1031

P1237 is actually a boost pressure low condition... OBD II Fault Codes p1237

However none of those would stop the engine firing, but may support the theory that the car has a wiring fault or maybe even an ECU fault. Have you checked all the under dash connectors, including those onto the ECU? I suggest you unplug and reconnect to be sure.

Was any work done on your car after it was last running with no problems?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks Jon_G, where is the ECU,is it behind the fuse box by the drivers right knee?
No work has been done, I've only had it 4 weeks and it's been spot on up until now.
 

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Sorry, I don't know where the ecu is located (I have an Accord).

If you bought from a dealer then surely you have a warranty?
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Private sale unfortunately. I'm not too sure what I can do about it even under the sale of goods act.
 

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no experience specifically to your issues, but due to the large amount of systems affected, i'd be looking at a common-point type issue ie: bad ground, or a connector somewhere.

It's highly unlikely you have a handful of individual issues. and far more likely it's a single point of failure.

first things first check battery, alternator and clean up all the ground/earth points your aware of. usually lots of ground points around the car.
Battery could be intermittently faulty causing a drop on volts enough to upset the electronics. see if you can get a test battery from another car.
i've seen alternators fail with internal shorts, which causes it to bring volts down low, and/or cause so much mechanical load on the alternator belt, that the engine stalls. probably not your problem, but if removing the alternator belt is an option, then thats one way to eliminate it. (check if waterpump is ran off the alt. belt)
earth issue could be as simple as a loose bolt, or high resistance - remove, sandpaper anything that isnt bare metal like paint or rust, and re-connect. I personally like to use copper grease as i re-connect.

wiring loom connectors could also be a problem. disconnect them and visually check for anything abnormal. shouldnt be any corrosion or burnt plastic/contacts. They'd be no harm in using some contact cleaner spray (non-conductive would be good).
based off the area of those fault codes, they all seem engine-bay related, so i'd be checking engine bay, and removing the connectors from the ECU (when you find it!)

again, civics are relatively new to me, so this is all general checks rather than 8th gen specific.

also, make sure things are disconnected when you pull stuff apart. *remove negative from the battery*. dont want to be hot-plugging stuff and risk blowing fuses or arcing terminals.
 

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i've heard of some cars (not sure if honda specific) that need fuse box replacing for electrical issues. apparently they have electronics inside them and not simply wire-in>fuse>wire-out panels anymore.
 

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Worth bearing in mind that some/all those codes read off were historic and may not relate in any way to the current problem.

Make sure that the battery is well charged and maybe even try a substitute that you know to be good. Low battery voltages can cause 'interesting' problems on these ECUs.

See if the engine will start using EasyStart spray (carefully). Obviously it will fire, but if it starts and runs then it points to a fuel rail depressurisation problem (quite common).
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Hi again, quick update.
I decided to get the ECU tested at ecutesting and that came back as working fine. So I'm now going to get them to test the speedo cluster as that acts as a sort of a communication gateway for the various modules.
The ECU's a bit of a long winded process to get at.
Arm rest needs to be removed,then gear stick surround and loosen the centre console so itll move enough to release the glovebox which the trims overlap slightly.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
More updates...
Ended up taking it to an Auto electrician and after 3 days with him and checking all the wiring and still not finding any faults,1 morning the faults magically disappeared, so he tried to start it and look and behold it started!
So £300 lighter but with a car that now starts the problem with the lack of power was still there.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Part 2....
So next step was to my local mechanic to find out what the hell was going on.
With the car now communicating properly, a low boost pressure fault came up and on further investigation, it looks like the turbo has seized, whether it's down to oil starvation,broken turbine shaft I'm not sure until it's either stripped or sent off.
Progress at a big price unfortunately!
 

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Part 2....
So next step was to my local mechanic to find out what the hell was going on.
With the car now communicating properly, a low boost pressure fault came up and on further investigation, it looks like the turbo has seized, whether it's down to oil starvation,broken turbine shaft I'm not sure until it's either stripped or sent off.
Progress at a big price unfortunately!
It's not uncommon on this engines that trubine goes bad. If not first owner or not knowing previous owner and how he drove or serviced car. I know here repaired turbine is somewhere arounf £270-300
 

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Discussion Starter #17
It's early days but....... ALL is well!!!!
No faults or running problems so far,touch wood!
It was found there was a fair bit of gunk in the oil feed pipe which contains a mesh filter, so it's probable that oil starvation caused the problems.
The turbine shaft I think had snapped and the hot side impellar was a mess(some bits found in the cat lol) and damage to the hot side housing, so a new exchange turbo was sourced froms turbo clinic in Leeds.
So a clean out of the oil feed pipes was carried out,new turbo,new air filter(which was filthy!),new fuel filter,new oil and filter,new coolant all done by my local mechanic who I couldnt thank enough who's very well known in the French scene.
Phew!!!
Now after a £300 auto electrician bill and a further bill from my local garage,over £1k later it's running again!
So my cheap acquisition has turned out to be not so cheap now, but on the bright side I should see some good life from those parts now and don't have to worry about the turbo going anytime soon.
 
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