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Discussion Starter #1
Was hearing a squeak from the front left of my car, so breaker hard every so often to see if something was stuck and to get rid of it.
Now at low speeds with window undone you can hear the disk catching everytime there's a full rotation of the wheel.
Has anyone had any problems like this and does anyone no how much a new set of front discs would set me back.
 

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Depends what the cars is. 2012 2.2 Civic. Mintex discs £56.00 for the pair then take your choice of pads. I used OEM Honda at £38.00.
The discs are a lovely bit of engineering. Hard to see how it can be done for the price, particularly when Honda discs are double the price. Mintex and Pagid are both made by TMD Friction, Germany.
 

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I'd get the disc checked for warping first - sometimes a noise on each rotation can just be variations in the disc surface, and doesn't necessarily point to damage.
 

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Warping of the disc is very rare. It's one of those things that are just given as a reason for giving you new discs.

A more common reasons is for a build up of coating and dust from your pads.

Taken from an article about brake systems:

"if a pad is not properly broken in (yes, this is a thing), the material that transfers between the pad and the disc can do so in a seemingly random, uneven fashion creating islands of deposits that keep growing, leaving high and low spots on the disc. Another problem is if you hold the pad against the rotor after intense braking or coming down from a high speed, the pad can literally leave a print of material on the disc like the image from StopTech above shows.

The other way your rotors can feel warped happens when your discs develop heat spots. Modern cast iron rotors are an alloy of iron and silicon mixed with particles of carbon. At high temperatures, spots of silicon carbides form and create uneven hot spots, growing in temperature faster than the iron around it. Once this temperature reaches up around 1300 degrees Fahrenheit, the cast iron around that area begins to form cementite, or iron carbide which is very dense, abrasive, susceptible to cracks, and conducts much more heat than the cast iron around it. Once the cementite forms, continued use will just heat up those spots, causing them to heat the iron around them and form even more cementite. It's a vicious cycle."
 

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Warping of the disc is very rare. It's one of those things that are just given as a reason for giving you new discs.
Agreed, there was a fantastic article recently posted here that described the actions of the braking system.

Also check your calipers, namely the 'slide ways'. My back brakes where making a squeal every rotation and it turned out that the brake pad was jammed in the slide ways.
Its a very simple task to clean up. All that is require is brake cleaner spray, wire brush and copper grease (for refitting).
Try to avoid over spray of brake cleaner and wire brush on the pistons rubbers.
 
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