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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Replace battery on 2012, Honda Civic, Series IX, 2.2 diesel (with built in Sat Nav)
There are no DIY instructions on the forum and there is no Haynes manual covering this exact model, so this might be of help. Very straightforward. The whole thing can be done with a 10mm long reach socket and a 10mm opened spanner in about half an hour. With this particular model and year, no Radio Codes are required to reset the radio as the ECU recognises it. I’ve used Janet and John language to make it simple and cater for anyone with limited knowledge.
Dead battery, Varta , Capacity 70 aH, EFB Technology for Stop/Start.
Genuine Honda (Varta) Battery obtained from Cox Honda Mail Order to exact specification above, (Part Number 31500-TV2-E02). Amazingly all batteries across the Honda range are priced the same. From Cox Honda it was £59.00 plus £5.00 carriage, against £75.00 plus £20 fitting at my local Honda dealer.
1. Lower the driver’s side window and remove ignition key.
2. Wait at least 5 minutes and then disconnect the negative (earth) terminal. (10mm socket) The negative terminal is the one on the right when facing the vehicle. The positive terminal is the one on the left with the red plastic cover. It is important to disconnect the negative terminal first. Remove the other end of the negative lead which is secured with a 10mm bolt to the bodywork.
3. Disconnect the positive terminal clamp (10mm socket – one nut) and lift off
4. Unscrew the two nuts securing the battery clamp (long reach 10mm socket ) and remove.
5. Push the terminals to the back of the battery box. That is with the terminals towards the rear of the vehicle.
6. Make sure you know where the hooks for the retaining bar are located before mounting the new battery and that the terminals and body earth point are clean to ensure a good connection. Good practice to smear with petroleum jelly (Vaseline)
7. Mount the new battery. Fit the retaining bar and ensure it is firmly secured but do not overtighten otherwise the battery might be damaged.
8. Fit the positive(left) terminal first, then the negative terminal (right) and then the negative body lead terminal bolt.
9. Reach through the driver’s window and turn on the lights for a few minutes. This will allow any accumulated surface charge on the battery to dissipate.
10. Turn on the ignition and wait a few minutes before starting the car. The short wait is said to allow all the modules in the vehicle to ‘boot’ and stabilize.
11. After reconnecting the battery the engine might run erratically until it has been driven for a few minutes, but that was not my experience.as soon as the ignition was switched on to press the ‘Power Button’ for two seconds. The ‘Power button’ is the left hand button (volume) and after a couple of seconds the system powered up normally.
Apologies for no pics. But it’s not rocket science.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Update 2022:
1. Replaced standard battery ( Honda Part No 31500-TV2-E02 ) with Varta E39 supplied by Tanya Batteries which is an AGM battery and about £20.00 more expensive than the standard Varta for the 2.2 in the hope of getting a longer life from it. It is exactly the same dimensions.
2. Don't forget to retune the radio for reception after replacing the battery
 

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Update 2022:
1. Replaced standard battery ( Honda Part No 31500-TV2-E02 ) with Varta E39 supplied by Tanya Batteries which is an AGM battery and about £20.00 more expensive than the standard Varta for the 2.2 in the hope of getting a longer life from it. It is exactly the same dimensions.
2. Don't forget to retune the radio for reception after replacing the battery
Hi. Is it a good advice to change from EFB to AGM battery?
Thanks
 

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Hmmmm, I don't think they last any longer generally than EFB, my vehicle with AGM needed a replacement before my EFB vehicle did... A battery is fitted to a specification, Civics were designed to use EFB - in what way do you consider them superior in this application? (fitting to a Civic)
 

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As I said one of the benefits of AGM against EFB is that they maintain a constant discharge better than an EFB. This is better for cranking, especially during cold weather. An EFB battery will drop of far quicker than an AGM. AGM Batteries also recharge faster than EFB batteries. I had an Optima Red Top AGM years ago that I ran as a pure audio in the boot battery for a couple of years, then I ran it for about 7 years as the starter battery on my mk5 accord. As it didn't fit my next car it lay in the shed for about 3 years before I sold it. The guy that bought it came along with a fancy battery tester and declared it in perfect condition. How many twelve year old EFB batteries will you find? Most are done by 4-5 years. Hey its up to everyone what they buy, its only when a battery fails and leaves people stranded do they wish they had bought a better quality one.
 

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Sounds like you got lucky in the battery lottery with that one Das (& it does seem to be a lottery to me) (y) 4-5 years is about right for both EFB & AGM batteries on average from what I read here & elsewhere, your 12 year old one was definitely an outlier lol, that said the original EFB in the Civic did a happy 8 years - go figure lol
The charge rate is governed by the vehicle so no advantage there
No excuse for getting stranded with any modern battery - you get plenty of notice before it gets critical with a modern vehicle... only if you ignore the signs will you get stranded.
 

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As I said one of the benefits of AGM against EFB is that they maintain a constant discharge better than an EFB. This is better for cranking, especially during cold weather. An EFB battery will drop of far quicker than an AGM. AGM Batteries also recharge faster than EFB batteries. I had an Optima Red Top AGM years ago that I ran as a pure audio in the boot battery for a couple of years, then I ran it for about 7 years as the starter battery on my mk5 accord. As it didn't fit my next car it lay in the shed for about 3 years before I sold it. The guy that bought it came along with a fancy battery tester and declared it in perfect condition. How many twelve year old EFB batteries will you find? Most are done by 4-5 years. Hey its up to everyone what they buy, its only when a battery fails and leaves people stranded do they wish they had bought a better quality one.
my car 1.6 idect still on factory fitted battery just thinking of changing as i am now getting the "auto stop not available"
but car still starting and running fine car is 66 reg now in 22 so efb is approx 7 years possibly 8 must be a good one
 

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My personal opinion is that Honda engineered the car and electrical system to use EFB battery technology. Anecdotes and internet hearsay of different battery types isn't going to change this fact, maybe they are better battery systems, maybe there isn't.
Having played around with enough electronics over the years thinking I know better than the manufacturer only for something to break, cause another problem or let me down prematurely, I shall use what Honda recommend. I'm not planning any trips to the Artic, It works perfectly well and as intended for me on UK roads.
 

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had the auto stop not available with the battery logo showing (btw i dont use the stop/start) but being a 2016 sport i thought i will have to change the battery, first thoughts, wow expensive but managed to pick a one on amazon black friday £103.75 for a yuasa 75ah 700a efb battery, easy to fit same size as original exide hopefully will last as long as the old one:)
 
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