2006+ Honda Civic Forum banner

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Discussion Starter #1
I have a few threads running on how to sound proof my car. I've dynamatted, etc with very little success.

The car was in for it's 37500 service on Friday and I mentioned to the service manager how noisy I thought the car was.

He took it for a test drive and agreed.

What they then found was that although the rear (un-adjustable) tracking was within spec (albeit on the outer limits), this was causing the rear tyres to wear in a stepped/feathered fashion. This causes the leading edge of grooves in the tyre to get turned up, almost like a burr.

To prove a point, they've put the back tyres on the front to see what happened. Sure enough, loads of unpleasant droning and road noise from the front now, but not the rear.

I'm not sure how this problem is going to be fixed, but I'm grateful to the service manager for finding this as my next course of action would have been more sound-proofing, which I'm sure would have made little difference.

So if anyone is suffering from road noise, check your rear tyres as they could be the culprit.

Tim
 

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Discussion Starter #3
You sum up in your thread all the frustrations I have. I really want to change it for a different car, but then I also want to keep it as it looks so good and the interior space and design is really good.

Tim
 

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Same with my 06 2.2 i-CDTi Sport - new tyres on back, back ones went to the front, hey presto - lots of noise. It's going in this week to get some new ones put on the front to see if that fixes the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I am advised the problem created on the back, will wear itself flat again when the tyres are transferred to the front, so I wouldn't dispense with those front ones too soon.

Tim
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I was told they should wear flat in about 1000 miles, but then I've only just had them switched over. Maybe they won't wear flat after all then?
 

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My wife had the same with her VW. Only done 20000 miles and the tyres were feathered and this caused a noise similar to worn out wheel bearing noise.

Swapped the tyres and the noise moved with them.

Bought two new tyres and hey presto quiet as a mouse.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Although the rear tracking is out of alignmnet, but within Honda spec, the service centre has haggled with Honda saying it's not acceptable due to the way the tyres are wearing. They made their point well as Honda has agreed to replace the rear torsion beam, which is being done tomorrow.

My local service centre (Devonshire Motors) really are brilliant as they have looked after me so well in the year I have had the Civic.

Tim
 

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i too seem to have this problem i have had my 08 plate civic sport for about 3 months and virtually from the off i thought i had a wheel bearing problem honda said no it was all ok only 17k on the clock they changed the tyres front to back this only made it worse so they changed it back. this humming has driven me crazy so i put new avon zz3 tyres on the rear and put the backs to the front. this has only served to transfer the humming to the front and it seems louder the garage that changed the tyres said the rears had become stepped is this a tyre fault or a car fault the tyres were michelin primacy pilots dose anyone think i have redress with honda cheers darron
 

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Discussion Starter #11
If it's the same as mine, it will be the rear torsion beam that is out of alignment that causes the stepped wear of the tyres. The torsion beam is not adjustable and although it was within tolerance the garage still got Honda to agree to replacing the torsion beam.

I also now make sure that when I change the tyres, the new ones go on the back and the back moved to the front. This is the opposite of what I would usually do, but it does mean the rear tyres are rotated and so suffer less from the wear problem.

The road noise is the only real downside to the Civic. I even stripped out all the rear seats and boot carpet to dynamat all the metal panels - really wasn't worth the effort though.

Tim
 

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Get the "FRS" (all 4 wheels) done by [ABP Motorsport] or whoever ...

Any 'tram-lining' virtually disappears, handling is hugely better \ more stable, and uneven tyre wear will be something that others complain of ! ...
 

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Wheel Alignment


Special Tool Required
Wheel alignment gauge attachment, 64 x 60 mm ( 07MGK-0010100)









The suspension can be adjusted for front camber and front toe. However, each of these adjustments are interrelated to each other. For example, when you adjust the camber, the toe will change. Therefore, you must adjust the front wheel alignment whenever you adjust camber or toe.


Pre-Alignment Checks


For proper inspection and adjustment of the wheel alignment, do these checks:


1.Release the parking brake to avoid an incorrect measurement.


2.Make sure the suspension is not modified.


3.Check the tyre size and tyre pressure according to tyre information.


4.Check the runout of the wheels and tyres.



5.Check the suspension ball joints. (Hold a wheel with your hands, and move it up and down and right and left to check for wobbling).








6.Bounce the vehicle up and down several times to settle the suspension.

Front Caster Inspection



1.Raise the front of the vehicle, and remove the wheel caps.

NOTE: Push out the cap on the aluminum wheel from the inside after removing the wheel.


2.Set the turning radius gauges beneath the front wheels, and place boards under the rear wheels the same thickness as the turning radius gauges, then lower the vehicle.

NOTE: Be sure that the vehicle is level with the wheels on the turning radius gauges and boards.



3.Install the wheel alignment gauge attachment (A) and camber/caster gauge on the wheel hub, and apply the front brake.



A
07MGK-0010100





4.Turn the front wheel 20 ° outward, then turn the adjusting screw of the camber/caster gauge to set the bubble at 0 °.


5.Turn the wheel 20 ° inward and read the caster on the gauge with the bubble at the center of the gauge. If the caster angle is not within the specification, check for bent or damaged suspension components.

Front Caster angle: 4 ° 14 '± 30 '

Front Camber Inspection



1.Turn the front wheels to the straight ahead position.


2.Raise the front of the vehicle, and remove the wheel caps.

NOTE: Push out the cap on the aluminum wheel from the inside after removing the wheel.



3.Install the wheel alignment gauge attachment (A) and camber/caster gauge on the wheel hub.



A
07MGK-0010100





4.Read the camber angle on the gauge with the bubble at the center of the gauge. If the camber angle is not within the specification, adjust the camber (see the right column).

Front Camber angle: 0 ° 00 '± 30 ' Maximum difference
between the right and left side:

0 ° 30 '

Front Camber Adjustment




The front camber can be adjusted by exchanging one or both of the damper pinch bolts with the smaller diameter adjusting bolt(s). The difference between the adjusting bolt diameter and the pinch bolt hole diameter allows for a small range of adjustment.




Damper pinch bolt:Adjusting bolt:
P/N 90188-SMG-305





1.Raise the front of the vehicle, and support it with safety stands in the proper locations.


2.Remove the front wheels.



3.Loosen the damper pinch bolts (A), and adjust the camber angle by moving the bottom of the damper within the range of the damper pinch bolt free play.



A
14 x 1.5 mm
106 N·m
(10.8 kgf·m,
78.1 lbf·ft)





4.Tighten the damper pinch bolts to the specified torque. Make sure the damper pinch bolts tightening torque.


5.Reinstall the front wheels. Lower the front of the vehicle to the ground, and bounce the front of the vehicle up and down several times to settle the suspension.

6.Measure the camber angle.

  • If the measurement is within specification, check the toe.
  • If the measurement is not within specification, go to 7.
7.Raise the front of the vehicle, and support it with safety stands in the proper locations.


8.Remove the front wheels.



9.Replace the damper pinch bolts with the adjusting bolts (A), and adjust the camber angle.

NOTE:
  • The camber angle can be adjusted up to about 20 ' by replacing one damper pinch bolt with the adjusting bolt.
    If the measurement is below ±50 ' (center of tolerance), replace the one upper damper pinch bolt with the adjusting bolt.
    If the measurement is above ±50 ' (center of tolerance), replace the upper and lower damper pinch bolts with the adjusting bolts.
    The camber angle can be adjusted up to 1 ° 40 ' (center of tolerance) by replacing both upper and lower damper pinch bolts with the adjusting bolts. However, adjustment is the maximum difference between the right and left side within 2 ° 20 '.
  • Use the new nuts (B) on installation.

A
14 x 1.5 mm
106 N·m
(10.8 kgf·m,
78.1 lbf·ft)
B




10.Tighten the adjusting bolts to the specified torque value.


11.Reinstall the front wheels. Lower the front of the vehicle to the ground, and bounce the front of the vehicle several times to settle the suspension.


12.Measure the camber angle. If the camber angle is not within specification, repeat steps 7 through 12 to readjust the camber angle. If the camber measurement is correct, measure toe-in, and adjust it if necessary.

Rear Camber Inspection



1.Raise the rear of the vehicle, and remove the wheel caps.

NOTE: Push out the cap on the aluminum wheel from the inside after removing the wheel.



2.Install the wheel alignment gauge attachment (A) and camber/caster gauge on the wheel hub.



A
07MGK-0010100





3.Read the camber angle on the gauge with the bubble at the center of the gauge. If the camber angle is not within the specification, check for bent or damaged suspension components.

Rear camber angle: -1 ° 00 '±30 '

Front Toe Inspection/Adjustment



1.Center the steering wheel spokes.


2.Check the toe. If it is not within the specification, go to 3.

Front toe-in: 0±2 mm (0±0.08 in.)



3.Loosen the locknut (A) while holding the tie-rod end (B).



Be sure that the hold the tie-rod end with a wrench.




A
14 x 1.5 mm
44 N·m
(4.5 kgf·m,
33 lbf·ft)
CB




4.Turn the tie-rod (C) until the toe is correct.

NOTE: Adjust both the right and left wheels at the same time by the same amount in opposite directions to obtain the correct toe and to keep the steering wheel straight.


5.After adjusting, tighten the locknut while holding the tie-rod. Make sure the toe setting does not change.

Rear Toe Inspection



1.Release the parking brake.


2.Check the toe. If it is not within the specification, check for bent or damaged suspension components.

Rear toe-in: 4±2 mm (0.16±0.08 in.)

Turning Angle Inspection




1.Raise the vehicle and set the turning radius gauges beneath the front wheels, and place boards under the rear wheels the same thickness as the turning radius gauges, then lower the vehicle.

NOTE: Be sure that the vehicle is level with the wheels on the turning radius gauges and boards.









2.Turn the steering wheel fully to the right and left while applying the brake, and check the turning angles of both front wheels. If the turning angle is not within the specification or the inward turning angles differ between the right and left, go to 3.

Turning angle: Inward: 16 inch wheel: 41 ° 05 '±2 ° 17 inch wheel: 36 ° 44 '±2 ° Outward (reference): 16 inch wheel: 33 ° 05 ' 17 inch wheel: 30 ° 38 '


3.Check the toe. If it is correct but the turning angle is not within the specification, check for bent or damaged suspension components.
 
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