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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all,

Anyone do their own servicing on their 8thGen?

I used to own a 96’ Integra Type R and access to the engine was very easy. I even did an engine swap on the drive.
How easy is the 8th Gen?

Thanks in advance!
 

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i-Vtec
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Its as easy as most cars. your first issue will be the service hatch, the bolts may be seized, broken, or the flap may not be there at all. Other than having to remove the whole undertray to change the gearbox oil its pretty normal stuff.
 

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Who ever invented these service hatches, undertrays/overstays/upside down trays that cover all the engine needs to be shot.

Thanks for your reply Das
 

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Do you mean the clutch fluid and the gearbox fluid?

If so, no, they are a completely different system.

Gearbox fill hole is on the side of the gearbox.

Clutch fill hole is in front of the brake fluid
 

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Who ever invented these service hatches, undertrays/overstays/upside down trays that cover all the engine needs to be shot.

Thanks for your reply Das
My Civic came without an undertray, and I won't be installing one. A complete waste of time in my opinion. Many people run their Civic's without them and is an option if you wished to do so.

A few people have removed the rear undertrays as well, but I'd personally prefer my plastic diesel tank covered up by a small layer of protection. Makes life hard for fuel thieves as well (the common method is to hammer a punch into the plastic tank and collect your diesel.)
 

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i-Vtec
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Undertrays are there to help with drive by noise regulations as well as some aero benefits. They do also help keep crud out of the engine bay. In the two years I've owned my civic I've not had a reason to take the pressure washer to the engine bay and thats a first in any car I've owned.
 

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It's not critical to have them, but they help with smoothing some turbulence out and some corrosion protection. The big one is if you have a oil leak it won't go all over the road and save us motorcyclists from dying.
 

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It's not critical to have them, but they help with smoothing some turbulence out and some corrosion protection. The big one is if you have a oil leak it won't go all over the road and save us motorcyclists from dying.
If the oil leak is excessive enough, it will leak through the trays, I had this with a rear main seal on a BMW 120D.

And a car will soon lose all of its oil if it's leaking in motion, usually oil leaks are evident when parked overnight and the oil has begun cooling down.

I've been on motorbikes since I was 16, and never had an issue with oil in the road. You can see oil in the road whether riding in the rain or dry. What's the most deadly on a motorcycle is people on their phones rolling up to lights, I always filter past cars and hope they have their handbrake up if I'm in a line of traffic. If I was rear ended on my bike at 30-40MPH I can almost guarantee I'd be paralysed.

We accountants would never have allowed the cost of a no-benefit item to be added to the build.
It was put in to comply with EU laws on fuel consumption etc.

I personally see little benefit of having one, other than the inconvenience when it comes to working under it.

It may save the car for a little longer against rust, but I can guarantee these Honda's will rot inside out and once the have tin worm they'll go before your eyes. And the plastic will do little to nothing as moisture & salt is what causes rust, if you've ever removed a cars under wing plastic, you'll see they hold road crud against the body and most of the crud is salt.

Just like the budget cheaply made Ford KA's (MK1) as soon as they showed rust on the filler cap, the whole car was rotten out. Some were seen rotting out within 5 years of coming out of the factory.
 

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Is that a guess or is it documented somewhere?
Well a guess as more holes covered equals less drag. Less drag equals better fuel economy.

so you would not consider complying with EU directives as a benefit to Honda or any other manufacturer?
I disagree with a lot of EU laws. In the EU they had a high number of fatality's with motorcyclists being aged 17-24. The EU's response? Add in a load of loops to jump through to get a bike license that them ages, instead of taking one £1,000 motorcycle test to ride an unrestricted bike you now need to do two-three separate licenses to be unrestricted at 22 years of age. Or wait until you're 24 and pay a one off fee and one license for £1,000. Which is a load of nonsense, I'm much safer on a big bike than a 125CC.

And most of the people I know that have lost their lives on motorcycles have been 24-30+ - And everyone that rides a motorcycle knows death is a high possibility when you do come off.
 

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I disagree with a lot of EU laws. In the EU they had a high number of fatality's with motorcyclists being aged 17-24. The EU's response? Add in a load of loops to jump through to get a bike license that them ages, instead of taking one £1,000 motorcycle test to ride an unrestricted bike you now need to do two-three separate licenses to be unrestricted at 22 years of age. Or wait until you're 24 and pay a one off fee and one license for £1,000. Which is a load of nonsense, I'm much safer on a big bike than a 125CC.

And most of the people I know that have lost their lives on motorcycles have been 24-30+ - And everyone that rides a motorcycle knows death is a high possibility when you do come off.
Used to be a bike instructor in the late 70s & early 80s so know exactly what you mean.
All the UK did back then to "improve motorcycle safety" was to make it more difficult and expensive to encourage teenagers to buy cars instead. All that has happened since is that both the bike and car tests have become more & more complicated and thus expensive. I don't think that the accident statistics have improved that much either.
 

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If the oil leak is excessive enough, it will leak through the trays, I had this with a rear main seal on a BMW 120D.

And a car will soon lose all of its oil if it's leaking in motion, usually oil leaks are evident when parked overnight and the oil has begun cooling down.

I've been on motorbikes since I was 16, and never had an issue with oil in the road. You can see oil in the road whether riding in the rain or dry. What's the most deadly on a motorcycle is people on their phones rolling up to lights, I always filter past cars and hope they have their handbrake up if I'm in a line of traffic. If I was rear ended on my bike at 30-40MPH I can almost guarantee I'd be paralysed.
That may be the case, but most oil leaks are not excessive, they're leaks not seal blow outs. I can give you loads of common leaks which are not excessive but enough to drip on the road. VAG cars intercooler pipes leak oil, drips. The undertray catches it and the wind blows it back under the trays, non goes on the road. Cam cover seals, etc list goes on.

I disagree, you cannot always see oil spills in the dry. We don't all ride the same or have the same bikes. At my company we get alot of truck deliveries and we are on a roundabout so diesel and oil accumulates their. I've seen and heard a few fellow employees come off their, normally new starters who don't know.

The rear end on my old M3 would slip out their without provocation, tbh the camber is terrible to.

I agree getting rear ended at the lights is not a pleasant scenario, I do try offset my bike to the side if I'm at the front of the queue but not always possible.

Ride safe
 
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