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Discussion Starter #1
Hi Guys, its been a while since I last posted on here but felt I had to with what I discovered today! Got home form work and could smell diesel when I opened the door. So, I had a look underneath and sure enough there was diesel dripping from the under tray. So out comes the jack and stands and I whipped off the under tray, here's what I found:







The last pic shows that this is a metal piece of pipe attached to a rubber fuel hose. My question is: WHY HONDA? WHY?

I cannot understand why they have done this? I am going to see if I can repair this by linking in another piece of normal fuel hose.

Has anybody else's 2.2 suffered this fault? Any comments or suggestions would be greatly appreciated.
 

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I remember someone else having the exact same problem.

Maybe a search would find the thread I remember, but I guess you can now fix it like you said.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi, Jon. Thanks for the reply. I would like to fix this but im hving trouble getting the pipes internal dimensions. Do you think that this is just a plain old piece of metal pipe? I mean surely they would have thought of corrosion issues with such a vital and potentially dangerous part?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Just wondering now if this metal piece is to aid with return fuel cooling?

Cant think of any other reason for it to go from plastic to rubber then metal and back to plastic again on its circuit?

Anyhow, does anybody know what the dimensions of this pipe are? I mean external and internal circumferences?
 

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Where exactly is is leaking from? The metal pipe or the rubber pipe? There looks to be a fair bit of corrosion where one of the larger pipes goes through the pipe clamp bracket.
 

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It's not just honda believe me, our DAF and MAN trucks are always doing this. Looking at the corrosion I seriously have concerns about honda build quality. I replaced my 20 year old mk6 civic with a 7 year old mk8 and the mk6 has no corrosion underneath with no under trays.
Can you get the outside dia of the rubber pipe. The use of rubber/plastic pipe is usually where the pipe has to be bent into shape. Bending metal is costly, putting rubber/ plastic isn't and in low pressure area.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It's not just honda believe me, our DAF and MAN trucks are always doing this. Looking at the corrosion I seriously have concerns about honda build quality. I replaced my 20 year old mk6 civic with a 7 year old mk8 and the mk6 has no corrosion underneath with no under trays.
Can you get the outside dia of the rubber pipe. The use of rubber/plastic pipe is usually where the pipe has to be bent into shape. Bending metal is costly, putting rubber/ plastic isn't and in low pressure area.
Its as if they decided not to use underbody seal and used an undertray for the whole underneath of the vehicle!

Its weird because the metal piece of pipe is on a straight run with no bends. It goes from plastic to a rubber piece that is clamped into position and then onto a metal pipe up until the bracket, then back to plastic! Surely there would have been some logic for this in its design? The only thing I can think of is to aid in cooling the return fuel?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Where exactly is is leaking from? The metal pipe or the rubber pipe? There looks to be a fair bit of corrosion where one of the larger pipes goes through the pipe clamp bracket.
It is leaking from the corroded metal section. Just want to attach a new piece of high pressure fuel hose in place of the metal pipe. As its the return pipe, I know its not going to drain the whole tank but its not good. Problem is, Im unsure as to if there is a specific reason for this metal piece to be made of metal?
 

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Possibly used for cooling but it's a short piece. Probably better to get honda part the you have the correct dia and laughingly the correct metal.
 

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This diagram might help you

Honda CIVIC 2006 2.2 SE FUEL PIPE (DIESEL) - Original Honda Parts | Lings Honda

So that metal pipe slides inside a plastic one or is it a plastic coating? I'd be inclined to fix it with a rubber fuel hose unless it runs close to an exhaust? It's hard to tell without looking in person. I know that the metal fuel return lines in the link above are around 60quid each, the rubber one is 16quid! :facepalm:

Looking at the diagram it's a **** to replace the whole return pipe.
 

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The rubber link pipe would actually insulate it not cool. Maybe it's to stop vibration?? That corrosion on the chassis box section doesn't look good either.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
This diagram might help you

Honda CIVIC 2006 2.2 SE FUEL PIPE (DIESEL) - Original Honda Parts | Lings Honda

So that metal pipe slides inside a plastic one or is it a plastic coating? I'd be inclined to fix it with a rubber fuel hose unless it runs close to an exhaust? It's hard to tell without looking in person. I know that the metal fuel return lines in the link above are around 60quid each, the rubber one is 16quid! :facepalm:

Looking at the diagram it's a **** to replace the whole return pipe.
Thanks for the linky although I have been on lings already. Been back underneath again and have patched it temporarily with high psi/temp/waterproof/chemical & oil resistant - self amalgamating silicone banding and a couple of hose clamps either side. Has stopped the leak for now until I get a new pipe section. No intention of replacing the whole return pipe as it is as you say, a complete *****!

Doesn't run parallel to the exhaust so cant see what issues it would cause to run a rubber fuel pipe section in there. It does appear to be a metal section that pushes into a plastic section, very strange!
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Actually, thinking about it now, it could well be that the whole pipe is plastic coated metal. But why would Honda leave this section exposed and open to the elements?
 

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Cheapness, so it goes through the bracket properly? It does look like it's started at the bracket. Maybe a bit of grit got in there and slowly worked the coating resulting in corrosion.

Trim the plastic back and stick a longer length of rubber pipe over it mate.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Cheapness, so it goes through the bracket properly? It does look like it's started at the bracket. Maybe a bit of grit got in there and slowly worked the coating resulting in corrosion.

Trim the plastic back and stick a longer length of rubber pipe over it mate.
I took the bracket off and the join back to the black piece of the pipe was directly inside the bracket. Couldn't be 100% sure that it was a join or if it was where plastic coating starts? But, yes, that's where the leak was, all corroded.
 

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Hi all, new to the forum but wanted to share my experience of this also. Last weekend my 2010 2.2 diesel civic sprung a fuel leak. As it was a Sunday we called out the RAC who removed the undertray and discovered the same corroded fuel line.

First thing Monday morning I called my local honda garage, booked it in for the Tuesday and picked it up fixed on Thursday morning! And the cost? Nada. Covered under the 10 year chassis corrosion warranty. Of course I do pay for it by having it serviced by them every year but I can't fault the service they've provided.

Having said that though, I asked if they'd replaced it with a plastic pipe now and was told no, they've replaced it with the standard honda metal pipe. I'll be booking myself in again in another 4 1/2 years time if it goes again! At least it'll still be within its warranty by then.
 

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I have the same issue! :-(

Recovery placed a temp rubber pipe in place to stop the leak!
I've taken it to a garage yesterday who's sure it's part no 35 & 19 on the pic attached - IF I can attach it! See link below instead. Ignore the red line, originally I thought it was that part...

https://mail.google.com/mail/u/0/?u...s=1441192393310&rm=14f88f82ea4830b5&zw&atsh=1


I'm waiting for a quote on the part. Is this the correct/best fix? Please reply ASAP!

Regards, Raul
 
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