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Discussion Starter #1
Hello all,
reading the post from Mr. Woette, Mr. Riddell and driven by paranoia I decided it's time to find the answer on my own. :crazy4:

Which direction should the discs rotate?
1) the slots or drillings in a disc do not determine the direction of rotation.
2) the geometry of the vanes dictates the direction of rotation.

Generally, there are three vane types in use:
Straight - non-directional, and can be used on either side of the vehicle.
Pillar vane - non-directional, and can be used on either side of the vehicle.
Curved vane - directional, must be installed with the vanes running back from the inside to outside diameters in the direction of rotation. This greatly enhances the disc's ability to dissipate heat.
Vanes.jpg

and therefore EBC discs (do not have curved vanes) should be installed like this (the reason for that is to "throw dirt/water/heat out and away from the disc"):
LEFT_slot_orienation_2_throw dirt-water-heat out and away from the disc.png RIGHT_slot_orienation_1_throw dirt-water-heat out and away from the disc.png
EBC_Overview.jpg

Be careful! all of Brembo's slotted discs are directional as well, regardless of the vane geometry... Should be installed with the cooling vanes running back from the inside to outside diameters in the direction of rotation:
curved_vanes_rotation.png
LEFT_slot_orienation_2_constant airflow to the grooves to aid cooling.png RIGHT_slot_orienation_1_constant airflow to the grooves to aid cooling.png

if any discrepancy found let me know:)
--
Best regards
Martin
 

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Cockup Specialist
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12,885 Posts
Yeah.... I guess it depends if the maker wants to expel air or draw air in.
But that is the the way I have the EBC GD disks on mine.

It looks like the ones with the curved internal turning vans are drilled.
The idea being to suck in air at the edge and blow air out the holes onto the disk surface and pad.
That would require a wall at the smallest diameter side of the air gap to pressurise the air (rather than open on both sides of the air gap).

So I guess it all comes down to how they are designed to work.
 
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