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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, I have had my new CRV for a couple of weeks now. I had a wee peek underneath and there is quite a lot of exposed metal.

I tend to keep my cars for a long time, and I sold my previous car at 10 years old because it was getting quite rusty underneath.

What are you thoughts on applying Waxoyl to the exposed metal? And would you do it yourselves with clear waxoyl, or get a centre to apply the black stuff?

Thanks a lot
 

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Wax oil is horrid stuff. I would use some thing like Dinitrol instead. It doesn't drip, and needs less topping up over the year. Comes in a spray can or you can use a compressor.
 

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This is the stuff you need. Superb products and efficient service.

Dynax-UB | Cavity Wax for high protection Rust Proofing

If you use Waxoyl, don't bother with the clear stuff, use the black. The Dynax-UB from Bilt Hamber comes in handy aerosols. Four cans should be enough for two coats, applied a day apart, so as to build up a good thickness of wax that will last at least ten years.

Try not to use the little Waxoyl type pump to apply because unless [and even if] you have a deep pit or ramp to work under the car on your feet, it is one heck of a messy job. Aerosols are just so much cleaner and easier.

No worries about warranty as long as you don't spray in silly places like on the exhaust, brakes, belts and so on. I always spray the corners and panels inside the engine bay and around the battery tray but don't get any drift on the windscreen. The leading edge of the bonnet, using the aerosol extension tubes is also worth doing sparingly through the frame holes.

Don't go wild with the stuff!. Better to keep away from areas you have doubts about and you need not waste the stuff by coating everything until it drips, hence two sensible coats.

I use a Shutz gun and compressor, but that is rather specialist. Below is my Toyota being Waxoyl'd. It needs patching in that picture, because no matter how carefully you apply, there will be light and missed patches here and there after the first coat. In the picture, the vehicle is about 11 years of age. I still run it daily and it is now 17.

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What an oily-looking mess! Any chance it might go up in flames if a lit dog-end gets thrown up and lodged somewhere?
 

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What an oily-looking mess! Any chance it might go up in flames if a lit dog-end gets thrown up and lodged somewhere?
The clue is in the name. 'WaxOYL'. However, after 12 hours or so, the solvent evaporates, leaving a semi-dry thin wax layer. Obviously still black but not that shiny and certainly not wet or oily as such.

Aerosol is certainly cleaner to apply. I used an aerosol on my latest truck. Not treated the Honda but had it up on a lift about three weeks ago and can't really see the need to wax it. If I did, priority would be given to the steel area to the centre-side of the plastic outer sills and all around the tow hitch frame area at the back.

If you can't hack the job, no problem, the Honda will certainly last 12 to 15 years as it comes from the factory.
 

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The clue is in the name. 'WaxOYL'. However, after 12 hours or so, the solvent evaporates, leaving a semi-dry thin wax layer...
Of course, so just like candle wax then! Do you keep a fire extinguisher handy, just in case?
 

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If it's new don't bother.

I've used Dynax in its various forms on my project Puma and it seems good. I don't have anything to compare it to, but BH don't make anything that isn't good in my experience.
 

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Of course, so just like candle wax then! Do you keep a fire extinguisher handy, just in case?
While there is a fire extinguisher located in the car, it has not been needed on that vehicle in 17 years. I first treated it when new in 1998 and re-treated in 2008 and 2011. If it lasts [or I last] to its 25th year and 300,000 miles I will then enter it in vintage shows.

I doubt if it is more flammable than the diesel fuel or various lubricants in the reservoirs located around the car, even in the 24 hours it takes for the carrier solvents to evaporate after application.
I had a Land Rover for 22 years which was treated when new and then at ten years of age. Apart from one outrigger, its chassis was as good as new when the vehicle was scrapped due to being totally worn out and uneconomical to repair. That or several others never caught fire either.
If you know of any vehicle that has ever caught fire or had a fire assisted by a wax-type underseal, please do post references here so that we may learn from it.
Heavy overspray on the exhaust, left to cure for at least 12 hours, just burns off without catching fire.

If anyone has any doubts as to their competence to treat their car, or even if it is necessary or they just can't be arsed, fine, don't do it. Its that simple.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
thanks for the info. Yes, it's a brand new CR-V. There are parts of the undercarriage which are sprayed but have no underseal.
I emailed Honda uk re warranty and they told me to check with my local dealer...
 

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thanks for the info. Yes, it's a brand new CR-V. There are parts of the undercarriage which are sprayed but have no underseal.
I emailed Honda uk re warranty and they told me to check with my local dealer...
How are you getting on? Done yet? Pictures?
 
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